Building bricks

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by johnjin, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. johnjin

    johnjin New Member

    Hi everyone
    Can anyone tell me what the differences are between engineering bricks and common bricks. I was always under the impression that engineering bricks are superior but now I have noticed that they are cheaper. So when should one type be used in preference to the other. And what are the benefits of either.
    Many thanks in advance
    John
  2. looking for work

    looking for work New Member

    engineering brick more for manholes or any underground work
  3. bigjules

    bigjules New Member

    Engineering bricks are available as either Class A, (usually blue but available red) or Class B, (usually red but available blue and brown).
    They have a greater compressive (crushing) strength than 'facing bricks' as well as a lower water absorbtion factor and greater resistance to chemical attack, hence the previous post stating that engineering bricks can safely be used for underground works, eg manholes as well as other locations requiring higher strength for example padstones upon which structural steels bear.
    Class A's are solid and Class B's are generally pierced or perforated but are available solid.
    Under current British Standards, there is no requirement for Class A or B engineering bricks to have an acceptable face, hence they are not generally facing bricks.
    However, some works do manufacture Class A and B facing quality engineering bricks but they are few and far between and very expensive.
  4. milkyjoe

    milkyjoe New Member

    are you sure they were engineering bricks they could have been facing bricks with the 3 holes in them but are a lot lighter than class b
  5. deacon

    deacon New Member

    Engineering bricks are available as either Class A, (usually blue but available red) or Class B, (usually red but available blue and brown).

    how would you know if you had a class a or class b brick if they are available in red but come in blue
  6. bigjules

    bigjules New Member

    how would you know if you had a class a or class b
    brick if they are available in red but come in blue

    How about asking the chap behind the counter where you bought them from or maybe reading the wrapping round the brick pack?

    To make it even more confusing, both red and blue A's are available solid and red B's are available pierced, perforated and solid!
  7. deacon

    deacon New Member

    so lets get this right ,red and blue bricks are class a but could be class b if they are perfrated or solid or with holes in ,right , class b bricks are blue and red they come solid, perferated and with holes in .yep , got that,Class b bricks come in brown no sorry red but also come in blue .hmmmm , Now I know .Think I'II use blocks or are they in classes
  8. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    so lets get this right ,red and blue bricks are class
    a but could be class b if they are perfrated or solid
    or with holes in ,right , class b bricks are blue and
    red they come solid, perferated and with holes in
    .yep , got that,Class b bricks come in brown no sorry
    red but also come in blue .hmmmm , Now I know .Think
    I'II use blocks or are they in classes



    They certainly are :D:D:D



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
  9. bigjules

    bigjules New Member

    so lets get this right ,red and blue bricks are class
    a but could be class b if they are perfrated or solid
    or with holes in ,right , class b bricks are blue and
    red they come solid, perferated and with holes in
    .yep , got that,Class b bricks come in brown no sorry
    red but also come in blue .hmmmm , Now I know .Think
    I'II use blocks or are they in classes

    Not classes exactly but graded by both crushing strength and density.

    For example, aerated blocks, (Celcon, Thermalite, Durox) have density of between 650 and 850 kilograms per cubic metre BUT have a crushing strength of between 2.8 newton and 10 newton.

    Aggregate blocks can vary between 1150 kg/m.cu. and 2500 kg/m.co with crushing strengths from 3.5 newton up to 30 newton and beyond.

    Easy, innit??
  10. deacon

    deacon New Member

    I have taken your advice and visited my local merchants ,100 engineering bricks please ,class A or B ,B please , red , brown or blue , blue ,no blues , red then , only brown ,holes please , how many , 3 please ,3 holes only in red ,youve got red , no ,what about class B ,yes 3 holes in blue , got any , no ,what about faced ones ,yes available in red ,blue with no holes or brown with perforations , blue please , no blues,great , what shall I do now , dunno this is a wine merchants , ** *

    [Edited by: admin8]
  11. The Brickie

    The Brickie New Member

    ** *

    I'll have the larger then please :)

    [Edited by: admin8]
  12. deacon

    deacon New Member

    This should solve your problem
  13. Stoday

    Stoday New Member

    Aggregate blocks can vary between 1150 kg/m.cu. and
    2500 kg/m.co with crushing strengths from 3.5 newton
    up to 30 newton and beyond.

    Easy, innit??

    Errrmmmm...

    A newton is a unit of force. The weight of a 100 gram mass is very nearly a newton. So stick 4 apples on your 3.5 newton block and they'll crush it.


    Of course, if you meant 3.5 newtons per square millimeter you'd be quoting something more realistic.

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