Consealed wiring in plaster

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by David1974, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    No probs Tore, have a good day m8
     
  2. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Active Member

    The main reason for using capping or oval conduit is not for mechanical protection, but to allow slack to be pulled if necessary or to allow replacement of the cable if it is damaged by a drill or nail etc. Plastering over a cable without using capping or conduit was always considered bad practice and frowned upon by the practitioners in the trade, I am surprised that acceptable standards within the industry have fallen to this low level. Mr C, please tell me you are not serious and that I have suffered a 'sense of humour by pass'.
     
  3. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    Where Col drinks you can get TWO for a quid !
    RS
     
    Joe95 and Coloumb like this.
  4. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Are you for real? Direct burial in plaster is a recognized install method in 7671. It never ceases to amaze me how much sparks avoid doing things that are perfectly acceptable just because they consider it bad practice.
     
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  5. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Well-Known Member

    Any plastic will not protect against nails/drill.
    If you use plastic ..use scrim over it and PVA or SBR. to avoid cracks.
    Plastic was only there to prevent trowel nicks when skimming.
    Plastic is a bit more professional.
    Dot and dab walling usually have no covers on cable.
    Rs
     
  6. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Sorry, but I am inclined to agree with Bob on this occasion, Col. Whilst there is no elecrical reason against plastering cables in directly, had this been a common place practice generally, house rewires would have been an absolute nightmare. I think it is bad practice to clip a cable to the wall then plaster it over, it's impossible to get it out without breaking the wall open. There have been numerous occasions where I have cursed the bloke who plastered in a cable when it would have been so much easier if were able to have pulled it out and replaced it. I generally avoid having any cables I install directly plastered in.
     
    Dr Bodgit likes this.
  7. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Active Member

    OK, so I accept that it is fine by the regs, you do it your way and I will do it mine. Remember that BS7671 specifies the minimum requirements for compliance, some may wish to just go a little further. With Dot and Dab as Retired Sparks has said, capping is not required as it may still possible to pull out damaged cables and replace them.
     
  8. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Shrugs
     
  9. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Although it is not required by BS7671 to use conduit or capping, it is a rough job not to use one of them.
    Any person who has a bit of pride in their work will use a minimum of oval or capping, whether it be a rewire or new build.
    A few other very good reasons have also been stated above by Bob,RS and Unphased.
     
  10. The capping argument is, and always has been nonsense...

    Who has ever pulled in a new cable through capping on brick/block and can guarantee that they haven't damaged the sheath in doing so?!

    The only reason capping has ever been used has been to protect against a plasterer with a sharp trowel and I have never spoken to a plasterer who thought it was necessary!
     
  11. Actually, in my flat, the fact that plastic capping is over the cable makes it less safe when modifying the wiring...

    A few years ago I wanted to make a light switch 2-way so I had to pull a four-core through the cavity behind the dot 'n' dabbed board... Would have been a doddle if some prat hadn't stuck plastic capping over it!
     
  12. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Your having a giraffe
     
  13. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Active Member

    Bianco, you are right, the possibility of sheath damage is real, but if you damage the cable pulling it up, you could always try again pulling it down, perhaps even altering the way you attach the new cable to the old. No one said it would be easy.
     
  14. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Right, so the best and often easiest way is just to pull out the old cable to get the plaster out the chase, and clip in the new one, plaster over.

    Before I gave up with capping it was always the case that some where, some how a little blob of plaster would leak in the "joint" between the back box and the capping and "glue" the cable in anyway. The only way round this is to proper put in regular conduit and gland it all off. It's the only 100% method your gonna get fresh cable sorted. And while your at it, might as well use singles. So who's got time for all of that then?
     
  15. It's worth noting that yanking a piece of old cable out through the skim is a lot easier and tidier when there isn't any capping on it!
     
  16. oddbod2

    oddbod2 Member

    Yeah, must admit i'm not a great fan of capping. If i think something really might need replacing i'll use conduit. I do use it, but more cos its expected than its really needed. Wouldnt get into a barny with anyone who thinks different tho.
     
  17. Conduit or nothing at all...

    Can't complain with pulling cables through a proper conduit, but through shallow capping against an abraisive brick wall?! It's asking for trouble and not what capping is for!
     
  18. sparky Si-Fi

    sparky Si-Fi Well-Known Member

    Static wiring, wtf is that, clip em to the wall and muck them in, 1mm cable buried in plaster, sit there all day long with a 6A 61009 up front
     
  19. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Strewth thats rough Si - granted its a fast buck, not for me though.
     
  20. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    People will be saying next that they render (sand and cement) over bare cables.
     

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