damp proofing with DRYZONE

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by ken, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. ken

    ken New Member

    Has anyone had any experience with it? Seeing as it's a new product the results may be just short term at the moment.Can anyone advise me to whether it works and how well as i'm sick of mopping up silicone off new stripped boards an dthe like

    Thanks in advance
  2. diydude

    diydude New Member

    Ken,
    I discovered that I had rising damp in my kitchen walls about 2 years ago.The damp proofing company that I got to do the job used Dryzone.I had to strip all plaster and render up to a height of 1 metre.They then bored holes about 150mm from outside ground height and then they injected the outside walls.they then bored holes in the inner wall and again injected the Dryzone.I had too leave inner walls for about 6 months to dry out before renovating plaster could be applied.Everything is ok so far.Company also guaranteed job for 20 years.
    Hope this helps.
  3. ken

    ken New Member

    diydude
    Many thanks for your reply. Normally with a silicone injection a sand cement render can be applied immediately with the additive as long as you let the wall breathe,using emulsion or nowt .Did you have to leave the wall bare for 6 months? That seems a long time to leave it commercially. Thanks again
  4. flyons

    flyons New Member

    I think the official BRE advice is to leave it for 6 months as this gives the wall the best opportunity to dry out. However in reality most walls are rendered the same day. Because the sand-cement renders used over damp-proofed walls are vapour-permeable the wall will dry out eventually - it will just take longer.

    The Dryzone website - http://www.dryzone.eu - doesn't say much about replastering, but I think it is covered in the rising damp guide that can be downloaded from the site

    I recall that rising damp treatment was covered in one of the BRE's "Good Repair Guides" which you can buy from the BRE websitre for about £10 each - http://www.bre.co.uk/
  5. nearnwales

    nearnwales New Member

    next time someone asked you to hack off for damp proofing take 1.20 and not a metre , I've seen lots of damp proofs with damp above the 1 metre mark ...
  6. flyons

    flyons New Member

    I think you're supposed to replaster up to 30cm above the highest signs of damp. To be honest, it's often less hassle to just replaster floor to ceiling - it doesn't cost that much more and you don't have to risk doing the job again if the damp rises above the new plaster (rising damp can actually rise more than 2m in some situations!).
  7. diydude

    diydude New Member

    Ken,
    The reason that I removed 1 metre of render is because thats what the damp proofing company wanted.I dare say if the dampness had risen higher up than that they would have wanted me to remove more.
  8. diydude

    diydude New Member

    Just remembered.Damp proofing company also said that for 1 inch thickness of walls that I had to leave the plastering for 1 month,hence the time of 6 months before replastering.
  9. schubertdog

    schubertdog New Member

    Have a look here
    http://www.constructionsupermarket.com/index.php?act=viewProd&productId=309
    I have done my own DP using these products. Follow the general guidelines freely available on the net:- hack off plaster to 1200mm or 300mm above highest sign of damp, drill into mortar course 100mm above floor at 100mm spacing 12mm dia and 75% depth of total thickness of wall. After injecting DP cream paint surface of wall with 50/50 diluted SBR bonding agent and plaster with renovating plaster before SBR dries (dries smooth as glass) Finish with normal finishing plaster and then emulsion paint.
  10. schubertdog

    schubertdog New Member

    Forgot to add, use stainless steel screws when refitting skirtings etc
  11. flyons

    flyons New Member

    The trouble is with that cheap Remmers cream that you get from construction supermarket is that it has a very low amount of active ingredient (silicone). When it first came on the UK market about three years ago their salesman tried to sell it to me and gave me a German datasheet saying you had to drill 20mm holes and fill them three times! To try and compete with Dryzone they then modified their datasheet to match the specification for Dryzone - even though the Remmers product contains about a quarter of the active ingredient!

    Damp-proofing is a messy and disruptive business so I always suggest that people try and get it right first time - i.e. use decent products and don't cut corners with replastering.

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