Domestic Water Pump Noise

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by wingit, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. wingit

    wingit Member

    I have a Stuart Turner pump, in a house I have moved into, feeding hot and cold water to a second floor bathroom (shower, WC and basin) and a first floor shower. It operated automatically when any tap/shower/flush is required. It is situated in the first floor airing cupboard, within a box made of chipboard and plasterboard, with several open grooves in the boxing for pipe exit. The cold water tank is above the fist floor. This is a 4 bar pump, 9 liters per minutes and 1.6Kw. I know I need to leave some air movement around the pump .. what can I do to reduce the NOISE, it's driving us crazy!

    Any suggestions on ways to dampen the noise; lagging, special boxes .. gratefully received!

    Thanks
  2. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    Not a lot! Is it really needed? How poor is the flow if it's switched off? Be careful about enclosing it too much as it needs to be kept cool. Try soundproofing the airing cupboard door and make sure the pump is stood on thin foam sheet. 4 bar is a pretty powerful pump and will not be silent. You can always talk to Stuart Turner they are very helpful people.
  3. wingit

    wingit Member

    Thank you sir for your reply. I have spoken to Stuart Turner .. one bathroom is above the level of the main water tank, therefore a pump is clearly needed. Excuse my ignorance, but 4 bars seems, also to me, a very high pressure rating; even if there are two showers operating and a flush. I realize that without seeing the system you cannot comment further,
    The pump I have is also a "negative head" pump .. which sounds odd, as the main tank is at least 10 feet above the pump.

    This pump serves:
    1. A shower on the first floor (same floor as the pump)
    2. A cistern on the second floor
    3. A basin (hot and cold) on the second floor.
    4. A shower on the second floor.

    The base of the main water tank is at the level of the second floor.

    Would you have chosen one pump to service all of these items? I can't help but think that individual pumps would have been more efficient ... and quieter .. I could retrofit?

    What do you think?

    I would be happy to give it a try. There is limited room in the cavity .. but I am sure I could accommodate a number of pumps .. do you have any recommendations for these duties?

    Thank you.
  4. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    individual pumps could be fitted but would be even noisier if they happened to be running together. You may get away with a 2 bar pump but no pump is going to be silent.

    It may be worth considering something like this as it is very quiet, it may not work in your house - speak to Grundfos and find their local recommended installer, they do a range of boosters.

    http://www.grundfos.com/web/homeUK.nsf/Webopslag/DMAR-6RZKWV
  5. britishblue

    britishblue New Member

    Thank you sir for your reply. I have spoken to Stuart Turner .. one bathroom is above the level of the main water tank, therefore a pump is clearly needed. Excuse my ignorance, but 4 bars seems, also to me, a very high pressure rating; even if there are two showers operating and a flush. I realize that without seeing the system you cannot comment further,
    The pump I have is also a "negative head" pump .. which sounds odd, as the main tank is at least 10 feet above the pump.


    If you look at the bold type above, that is why you require a negative head pump. A normal pump (not negative head) has flow switches in the hot and cold sides that activate the pump when either of them detects that the water is flowing. With a tap or showerhead above the water tank, there is no initial flow oof water to start the pump.

    Stuart Turner are the Rolls Royce of pumps, and 4 bar is a pretty powerful pump which is capable of supplying at least two showers simultaneously.

    The noise from the pump may well be accentuated by the boxing around it. The pump really needs to be mounted on a resilient rubber or foam pad to isolate it from the floorboards.

    Any pump that you choose to replace your existing pump is likely to be inferior to your Stuart Turner pump.

    BB

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