Gravity feed for electric shower ?

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by davesue, Feb 13, 2011.

  1. davesue

    davesue New Member

    My old triton T90i shower has packed up and I would like to replace it with an electric shower. The Triton was fed from a cold water tank in the loft only,
    can I  just plumb a new electric shower in it's place?
  2. G Brown

    G Brown New Member

    No, only  very few electric showers are designed to run off tank fed supplies, nearly all are designed for mains feed.
  3. davesue

    davesue New Member

    So I would be better off taking tank out and using feed pipe of that to feed shower
  4. palavaman

    palavaman Active Member

    the tank is likely to be feeding other appliances (toilet, basin, etc).  So better to just tee off feed to tank, fit an issolatin/servicing valve, then connect your electric shower.  BINGO, lovely powerful shower, hhmmmmm;)
  5. Dave and/or Sue, your old T90i had a built-in pump as well as the heater (I never knew such things existed...), so you'd need something similar for it to work from your cold tank.

    If you want a 'normal' electric shower, you need to run it from your 'rising' cold mains. Check that your cold mains pressure is up to it first.
  6. davesue

    davesue New Member

    tank just feeds shower
  7. davesue

    davesue New Member

    how would I do that?
  8. Crowsfoot

    Crowsfoot Active Member

           Here's a really good rule of thumb for testing that.
           Fully turn on the WHB tap in the bathroom, then whilst keeping your eye on the tap the whole time flush the WC.
           Did you notice a reduction in the water flow fom the WHB tap?
           If you did; don't fit an electric shower.
           If you didn't,it's OK to go ahead and fit the sahower.
  9. Ah. Ok. If you want to consider fitting a 'normal' electric shower - that is, one that runs directly from the cold mains and a leccy supply - then you should be confident that the mains water pressure and flow are up to it in the first place.

    Pressure and flow are different things tho' they are connected in practice. All you can do easily is measure the 'flow'; get a bucket, place it under your KITCHEN cold tap and turn it on FULL while starting to record the time. Give it 30 seconds and turn off. Measure how many litres there are in the bucket and 'times' that by 2 to get 'litres per minute'.

    Come back on here and tell us what you found. As for pressure, you really need a pressure gauge... However, describe what happens when you turn the cold kitchen tap on full - does the water splash into the bowl with reasonable force? Does it bounce back up and cause spray?

    What are doing reading still this - go and get a bucket.
  10. be bop

    be bop New Member

    As said your electric shower will have a integrated pump in it,if only shower off tank maybe fitted to combat low water main issues,such as at peak demand or stop any temp/pressure changes when other outlets turned on in house
    I would just replace unit with a new integrated unit,same as in now,they have come down in price,around £200 now,will find better performance
  11. davesue

    davesue New Member

    Sorry for not getting back sooner, anyway 11.5 litres a minute.Water comes out with reasonable force but doesn't cause a spray
  12. 11.5 lpm is just about adequate for most purposes - but only just. I'm not an expert on this - so get professional advice first - but I suspect you'd be taking a risk fitting a normal electric shower on that. As be bop says, mains water flow and pressure can (will...) fluctuate a lot throughout the day, and 11.5 is barely 'just about' ok as it is.

    Perhaps safer sticking with what you've got - an electric shower with built-in booster pump?
  13. davesue

    davesue New Member

    Thanks for help
  14. davesue

    davesue New Member

    Thanks for info

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