Is Fernox LSX ordinary silcone?

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by How?, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. How?

    How? New Member

    Is Fernox LSX ordinary silcone in an expensive tube?

    When it says use it with a bandage to seal leeks, what sort of bandage do people use?

    I have always used Wickes jointing compound and it has been very good.

    Ta.
  2. tackleburger

    tackleburger New Member

    Not it isn't. It is a compound that doesn't fully set. Bandage is hemp or something similar. I rarely use it and if I do it's for very minor seeps that have an access problem.
  3. How?

    How? New Member

    Thanks,

    I have left some Fernox LSX and some Dow Corning 785 on a copper pipe, (wet and dry bits) and both seem to set to exactly the same level.

    I therefore think that the fernox is just overpriced silicone, and I could use silicone as a jointing compound in that case, any views?
  4. Water Systems

    Water Systems New Member

    Thanks,

    I have left some Fernox LSX and some Dow Corning 785
    on a copper pipe, (wet and dry bits) and both seem to
    set to exactly the same level.

    I therefore think that the fernox is just overpriced
    silicone, and I could use silicone as a jointing
    compound in that case, any views?

    Doesn't most silicon go mouldy when exposed to water? The non-moudly stuff is expensive. Also there is the problem of coping with pressure.

    I have never used silicon for pipes, so I don't know if it is any good. It would be nice to know if silicon has similar properties.
  5. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    LSX is WRAS approved for pipe jointing, other silicones are not.

    It does not contain additives unsuitable for drinking water.

    It also cures quickly in the presence of water.

    Other silicones may well seal joints but they are NOT WRAS approved and contain anti-mould chemicals which should not be used with drinking water.

    Don't be a bodger. Use the correct materials for the job.
  6. How?

    How? New Member

    Thanks Captain, good point about wras.

    I am not going to bodge it, and have always used approved jointing compound from wickes, which seems to work well on compression joints. Then I saw LSX, also claims to be good for sealing leaks and compression joints, but it is just like silicone.
  7. Water Systems

    Water Systems New Member

    Thanks Captain, good point about wras.

    I am not going to bodge it, and have always used
    approved jointing compound from wickes, which seems
    to work well on compression joints. Then I saw LSX,
    also claims to be good for sealing leaks and
    compression joints, but it is just like silicone.

    This Loctite product is briliant. It goes a long way if not slopped on and always seals. It is a good insurance policy as going back to leaking joints is time consuming. You know it will make the seal.

    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=72039&ts=83954
  8. morbius

    morbius New Member

    Thanks Captain, good point about wras.

    I am not going to bodge it, and have always used
    approved jointing compound from wickes, which seems
    to work well on compression joints. Then I saw LSX,
    also claims to be good for sealing leaks and
    compression joints, but it is just like silicone.

    LSX is very similar to the wickes stuff, but seems to work better for me, as you say excellent on compression joints.
  9. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

    The Loctite compound in the link above is not WRAS approved and is toxic to aquatic organisms, especially in the long term - so any water coming into contact being used for fish tanks etc will be toxic.

    As stated before, many compounds will work - not all are WRAS approved but they need to be for plumbing use.
  10. tackleburger

    tackleburger New Member

    You can buy liquid PTFE which is approved. Great for awkward spots but pricey I stick to tape round the olives-never failed me yet.
  11. Yes, but all of you seem to be talking about using sealing compounds on compression joints.

    However, no jointing compound is needed on a compression joint on clean and undamaged copper tube!

    Tony
  12. Captain Leaky

    Captain Leaky New Member

  13. morbius

    morbius New Member

    However, no jointing compound is needed on a
    compression joint on clean and undamaged copper
    tube!

    Tony

    I never use clean and undamaged copper - far too expensive:).
  14. DonMilne

    DonMilne New Member

    "Is Fernox just an expensive tube of silicon"?  I had exactly the same question in my mind when I first tried Fernox LSX. However, a few things have become clear to me after using it. (1) this is really high quality silicon - use a cheap silicon sealant and you might find it hardens or perishes after a year - like in my bathroom! (2) Most silicons will not stick properly to anything even slightly wet: not an ideal feature in a plumbing compound! (3) it cures in a couple of hours, so you can be back up and running the same day (other sealants I've used suggest leaving it 24hrs to cure), and finally (4) A little goes a long way, so the cost of the tube is nothing really.

    So yes, it is just a kind of silicon sealant, but it's a version which is perfectly adapted to the job. I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.

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