Wiring a new electric hob and single under counter oven.

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by quimley2, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. quimley2

    quimley2 New Member

    HELP....

    Can I start by saying I have full respect for electricity and know that it is not to be messed with....Yes I know that this should be undertaken by a qualified person but unfortunately I simply cannot afford to get a sparky out....

    I need some assistance in connecting power supply of a new electric hob and single under counter oven.

    The old electric oven was fitted with a plug and socket was run from the consumer unit.

    Can my new oven (CATA MODUS) be connected in the same manner. In addition to that I have purchased a ceramic electric hob which also needs connecting....


    Please can anyone offer guidance....
  2. B

    B New Member

    what size cable is supplying the circuit ?
    what KW rating is the oven  and hob ?
    what size over current protection device is fitted ?
    if the oven is over 3KW then it can not be connected with a  plug/socket
  3. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    Best ask B&Q where you bought it
  4. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    If you are Midlands based I can do it for you. However, general rule-of-thumb. Most SINGLE electric ovens are rated at 3kW or less and are supplied fitted with a plug. Most DOUBLE electric ovens are rated over 3kW and require their own 32A radial circuit and will not have any connection pre-wired. Insttead the app;liance has a terminal connection plate on the back accessed under a cover. Most CERAMIC hobs are rated above 3kW and also require a 32A radial circuit. Again these won't have any pre-wired means of connection. If you have a 32A radail circuit installed for your cooker and your appliances total 15kW or less you are allowed to connect both on the same radial circuit. If you have a single oven and anceramic hob, the ceramic hob goes on the 32A radial and the oven plugs in to a socket.

    These are general guidelines and not a catch-all so keep in mind.

    ;)
  5. snezza31

    snezza31 New Member

    UP,

    Which single ovens are supplied with a plug? Thats a new one on me !!!!!

    Snezza31
  6. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    A plug would be directive , but many have a 1mm 1.5mm flex which is obviously plug friendly Doh
  7. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Why is it a new one on you, Snezza? I have seen loads of single ovens delivered with a flex and a plug ready to plug the appliance in. The larger single ovens (over 3kW) and double ovens as I explained in my post need to be hard wired on to either the cooker control or the cooker outlet plate if one is provided. So now you know. :)
  8. snezza31

    snezza31 New Member

    Hi UP,
    Well, now I know apparently!:) Only you havent answered my question mate!

    My question was simple! Which single ovens are delivered with a 13amp 3 pin plug on? Its just that I have never seen one.

    Ive fitted, litterally, hundreds of ovens but I cant recall ever seeing one come with a plug on it. Manufacturers name???

    Snezza31
  9. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    :) Sorry for any confussion Snezza but hey ho. I usually ask for the oven ratings off the customer anyway to be on safe side, but single oven and socket has generally been the norm. Qualification of my statement is LESS than 3kW.
  10. snezza31

    snezza31 New Member

    AHA!
    That explains it now! Single ovens dont come with a plug on mate, of any description. As you said, they can be wired into a 13A plug as long as they are less than 3kw.

    Most of the single ovens that I supply and fit are rated at 16A, which as we all know , makes it a bit more of a pain in the ... to get an adequate supply for. Combi Microwaves are a different story altogether.............!
  11. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    I don't know where you're getting the 3kW figure from, BS7671 says that cookers of 2kW or over should be on a dedicated circuit.  3 kW is right on the limit for 13 amps, you must have seen what happens to 13a plugs and fcu's on immersion heater elements? I don't think a 3 kW oven on a 13a plug is a good idea, even if it is on a dedicated circuit.
  12. quimley2

    quimley2 New Member

    they are not called DIY.com for nothing... waste of time...
  13. A J Cox

    A J Cox New Member

    Hey guys,
    I Know this is an old post but firstly I've just bought a new oven, a Hotpoint, and guess what...it comes with a 13A plug pre fitted. (So there's a manufacturer for you snezza31 :) )
    The old cooker and ceramic hob were wired into the cooker circuit using a seriously large piece of choc block...mmm. Bit worrying I thought, but it's been ok for the last 10 years.
    Obviously I mustn't chop the plug off or the warranty goes out the window. So I've wired a 13A loose socket to come off the choc block and plugged the oven into that, whilst the hob is wired straight to the choc block. So the hob and oven still come off the same circuit.
    The question is, is this ok or should I be getting something better than choc block (connector block)?

    Thanks
  14. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    The choc-block is ok provided it's heavy enough for the current involved, it should be in enclosure of some sort though.
  15. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Cookers hardly ever run at full load, thats why they can be plugged in. Diversity. I would say that the vast majority of electric single ovens are plugged in to a socket. :)
  16. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    Agreed sen. However, personally you would be far better removing the connector block and using a 30A jb. The jb is totally enclosed and is designed for the joint whereas connector blocks should, as you point out, be inside an enclosure rather than left in the open and wrapped in insulation tape.

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