1" pegler float valve

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by Mickvgma, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Hello ive searched forum and need to know how such a basic valve can become leaky.
    Its a brass pegler float valve 1" i think, was fitted back in 95.
    It supplies cold water to tank in the loft. Every morning theres a trickle of water coming out the overflow, ive replaced the rubber seal with one from screwfix but still hasnt made any difference, ive bent the arm down a little to reduce water level also reduced the flow of water to minimal pressure at stop valve but no joy. Looking at the valve theres nothing to it really but im wondering if in time they just simply wear out. a replacement is around £200. Are there cheaper alternatives? Theres a 36mm ish nut on back side of tank next to a 40mm pipe, the water comes from 32mm plastic white pipe its pretty hefty set up and i assume ill need the new valve to marry up with this. Any advice would be brilliant, and i apologise for resurrecting this old subject but couldnt find an answer.
    Best wishes mick
     
  2. dcox

    dcox Active Member

    Fed by a 32mm plastic pipe? Got a pic of the pipework and valve please?
     
  3. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member

    What do you mean a replacement is around £200 ???

    Pegler is a good brand indeed but you did say ‘brass’ didn’t you ans not solid gold :confused:

    Think a new valve would be around a tenner ?

    Have you been quoted £200 by a plumber to supply and fit ????

    Please say no ......... ?

    If you can replace the seal yourself you can clearly change the complete valve urself and just charge yourself around a £10....... leaving £190.00 to spend elswhere :)
     
  4. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Hello Dcox thanks for replying, i attempted to upload four pics but they failed due to file size being tok large. Not sure how to reduce them tbh with you. Its a mains water inlet i assumed the pipe would be this size becuase of this fact. Many thanks
    Mick
     
  5. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Hi DIYdave, i searched the net couple weeks ago and found an exact match but yes it was that much.
    Id love to just replace the valve but its got to fit the existing connection.
    Cheers mick
     
  6. dcox

    dcox Active Member

    Most mains water inlet pipes are 15mm (1/2”) or sometimes 22mm (3/4”) if the tank needs to replenish quickly, so 32mm would be unusual in my experience.
     
  7. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    I will try and take more pics bear with me please
     
  8. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member


    Maybe I’m wrong Mick, as my forum name says, I’m diy but...... are we talking a float valve for a domestic cold water tank in the loft ??

    Why would it be 32mm supply ?
    What size tank is this ?
    Do you live in a mansion ?

    Usually the tail screws off from the valve so can you not use existing connections / tail and fit to new valve (which will cost less than a tenner)

    Excuse me if I’m talking outta me arris :)

    Post some pictures of current set up - will be helpful
     
  9. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Unable to fix the file size all i can do is explain the best i can and describe the fittings the valve is fixed to. First nut which is in contact with tank is 36mm, then theres 40mm copper pipe about 30mm in length connected to what looks like two 40mm nuts next to eachother which is then connected to this 32mm white plastic pipe. Confuses me tbh. The very first nut which is in contact with the outside of the tank is what im assuming the valve is connected to initially. Any thoughts would be helpful thanks mick
     
  10. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Thanks for reply dave, its a massive house yes and tank volume is somewhere near 1000 ltrs. Im trying to figure out witbout removing tbe existing valve what size the fitting is so i can get correct size.
    Cheers again
     
  11. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Iys 1
    Its a 1363ltr tank btw
     
  12. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member


    Hence the 32mm supply and I’m now well and truly outta my depth

    Apologies for suggesting you had your figures wrong at £200 for valve, just didn’t want to assume that you were being ripped off for fitting a £10 valve and being charged 200 smackers :eek:

    Good luck mate
     
  13. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Use Tiny Pic to resize photo's.

    http://tinypic.com/

    Last 1" float valve I bought for a tank on farm water tank, cost around £45 a few years ago.
     
  14. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    300 gallon ! You could swim in that!

    You can get unbranded ones for about £30, a branded Pegler £60 to £70
     
  15. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Yes its heavy duty stuff i think thanks for your time
     
  16. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    So im thinking that as an option i could fit a reducer to enable me to install a domestic valve with dimensions ive given previously does anyone know if such a reducing connector exist?
     
  17. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    Replacing the washer should have sorted it, so the only thing left that could be faulty in the valve is the seating part which is a sort of nozzle. They are usually made of plastic and can have hairline cracks which are often difficult to see unless you dry the seating and hold it up to light.
    That shouldn’t cost much!
    But also check you don’t have water passing into the tank from elsewhere in the house - mains going through a shower or tap mixer or coil inside cylinder cracked and f&e tank higher than cwt.
     
  18. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Thanks heat, yes its a nozzle type item thats seated inside the main body of the valve, the 1" brass slug that has the rubber seal moves in and out the body prettg basic item from looks of it. Could i source a reducing connection thats suitable for smaller thread width for a domestic valve? The tank doesnt cycle much water tbh its alot larger in capacity than it needs to be, problem is the existing connection is probably larger diameter to that of a domestic connection and its fitted through the tank side. Cheers
     
  19. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    Personally I would just repair the valve if it is otherwise in good condition. The seating part would be inexpensive.
     
  20. Mickvgma

    Mickvgma New Member

    Thanks heat, looking inside the main body of the valve i can clearly see a seat, i have not yet closely inspected it for defects yet as you advised, i wasnt aware the seat could be replaced? I assume they are threaded and screw into the body is that correct?
     

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