18th. question.

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by seneca, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Hi all, any comments welcome on this one.
    Is it still acceptable to have a socket outlet for a specific use not rcd protected under the 18th?
    I fitted a single 13a socket outlet recently in a loft space for one of my regular customers, it is to supply a security camera system and the suppliers asked for a socket to be provided. It is supplied from the first floor lighting circuit which doesn't have rcd protection. (16th. ed. board) There is not the slightest chance of the socket being used to supply anything else and I would like to issue a mwc stating that the socket is only to be used for this specific purpose. If it's a major issue I could get back to the customer and arrange to fit an rcbo but I don't really think that is necessary?
     
  2. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    Prob is someone may use it and if they have an accident it's on you so I would fit rcbo
     
  3. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    You can always get a socket fitted with RCD protection
     
  4. Risteard

    Risteard Screwfix Select

    The answers are in BS 7671:2018
     
  5. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    Good thinking Gas Monkey, I never even gave that a thought, don't know why as I've fitted several of those recently!
     
  6. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    What do I know I'm just a simple creature any time sir
     
  7. No exception now in a house, even for a piece of dedicated equipment,all must be RCD protected up to 32amp.
     
  8. Comlec

    Comlec Screwfix Select

    Surely, the RCD on lighting circuits applies to new circuits. So why would adding an extra fitting to the existing circuit require an RCD.
     
  9. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    It's on a 16 box
     
  10. seneca

    seneca Screwfix Select

    That's how I was thinking of it Comlec but i'm happy to be corrected.
     
  11. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    Yet another helpful piece of constructive advice.

    Wonderful answer (not)!
     
    seneca likes this.
  12. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    Agree haven't done the 18th only 17th in 2008 so a bit out of it but the help was a nil agree
     
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  13. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Screwfix Select

    It really gets my goat when he professes to be so perfect, then gives useless information and thinks he is helping.

    Kind regards
     
    Comlec and seneca like this.
  14. JC2779

    JC2779 Member

    As Deleted member 11267 said there is no exception for a domestic property regardless of what its being used for or if its accesible or not. Simpliest solution is to fit an RCD socket as Gas monkey said :)

    The regs don't only apply to new circuits, they apply to any new wiring and installation of new equipment.

    If you were to remove a centre light and install downlights in a room they would require RCD protection as you are adding in new lights and cabling. If you are taking down a centre light and replacing it with a new one then that's maintenance and wouldn't need an RCD.
     
    seneca likes this.
  15. peter palmer

    peter palmer Super Member

    Just another pointless rule that otherwise unemployable people dream up to keep themselves in non jobs.
     
    Comlec likes this.
  16. Comlec

    Comlec Screwfix Select

    Well, can you helpfully point us to the specific regulations so we can all learn. So the next time Mrs McTumpshie asks for an additional light in her bungalow I'll be able to show her the regulation that requires me to replace her perfectly serviceable Wylex fuseboard with a shiny new bit of tat with an RCD.

    The logic of what you are saying that no circuit in a domestic premises can now be altered unless it has RCD protection. Good luck with flogging that one to your customers.

    PS I did my 18th nearly a year ago so thankfully, forgotten most of it:)
     
  17. JC2779

    JC2779 Member

    411.3.4


    im not trying to "flog" anything to my customers its simply a case of the new regulations requiring RCD protection to just about all circuits in a domestic property now.

    Maybe you should go back and re-do it then.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019
  18. peter palmer

    peter palmer Super Member

    If you altered an existing cooker circuit that doesn't need or have an RCD and the bit you installed was buried then you would have to RCD that circuit. Using the same logic, if you altered a lighting circuit that didn't involve burying any cables you would still have to RCD it because all lighting circuits now need RCD protection.

    That's if you always do as you are told of course.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019
  19. gas monkey

    gas monkey Well-Known Member

    Was thinking of doing the 18 th but from a bit of looking 62 pages and only lightning and a risk assessment is it worth it thoughts
     
  20. peter palmer

    peter palmer Super Member

    Its never worth it, not unless you are a bookworm that likes flushing hundreds of pounds down the toilet every few years.
     

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