1st & 2nd fix housing site tips

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Robert2301, Aug 9, 2018 at 11:10 PM.

  1. Robert2301

    Robert2301 New Member

    Hi starting on a new build housing site Monday doing price work and was just wondering if anyone had any tips to do stud work faster and 2nd fixing faster as last time I couldn't make much money and wasn't very organised. Any tips would be great! Thanks!
     
  2. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    Invest heavily in power tools and complete each stage of the fix before moving onto the next I.e. door linings, doors, architraves, skirting etc.
     
  3. goldenboy

    goldenboy Well-Known Member

    Cordless all the way, same battery platform.

    Have a tote set up for each job.

    Have a rubble sack for rubbish ready to go.

    Get a routine going.
     
  4. jimoz

    jimoz New Member

    Perhaps post some of the rates up others can see if they think they're fair?
     
    Mgreen201 likes this.
  5. ginger tuffs

    ginger tuffs Member

    if you have already got powertools you will need a generator and a good chain then organised yourselve you will get quicker the more you do
     
  6. Robert2301

    Robert2301 New Member

    Thankyou for all the replies! I have mostly battery power tools now and loads of batteries and a generator with a chain and a chop saw, have a festol chop saw but think it's a bit big to keep moving around and does anyone have any techniques to do Stud work faster? Measuring with a tape measure seems to take to long and I see other doing it very fast! Thanks!
     
  7. Robert2301

    Robert2301 New Member

    I think the rates seem to be fair as they are all roughly the same around my area and other seem to make good money but they seem to know exactly how to do stuff and seem very organised
     
  8. ginger tuffs

    ginger tuffs Member

    get yourself a lengh of 2x1 and staff everything like all common sizes
     
    Robert2301 likes this.
  9. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Get a hilti laser pen.
    Get a stabila 106T level.
    Start upstairs first then work down.
    Set your chop saw and stand up in the main bedroom with the pile of studs behind you as you're using the saw.
    Cut all your sole plates first and fix, then plumb off them using the above tools to find the exact lengths of your head plates if coming off a block wall, if head is coming off a stud wall cut the head and sole identical sizes.
    Keep your studs exactly to the marks, makes it easier to cut all your noggins at once exactly the same size.
    Keep your door heads 80 1/2" high to the underside.


    Your Festool chop saw is far too good to be taken on site, get yourself a 8" blade sliding double bevel saw, light to carry and can cut most things.
     
    kitfit1 likes this.
  10. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Where is your area and what are the rates?
     
    Mgreen201 likes this.
  11. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    All good advice, especially on the Festool chop saw. Hell, i wouldn't even take my Makita on a building site......................not if i wanted it to still be in my possession at the end of a working day.
    Keep your genie close enough so that you can hear it running all the time.................if you can't hear it, you won't know if it's still there.
    Don't ever take any more tools than you need out of the van and onto the job, especially batteries.
     
  12. Mgreen201

    Mgreen201 New Member

    U can get good chopsaw from screwfix for £50 ( even cheaper at times ) just get a decent blade. . Set up a bench . Mark ur centres on sole plate and header at same time . Get a labourer to go ahead and do all insulation vapour barrier and celotex then shoot the 2×1 on for u ready to sheet.
     
  13. Mgreen201

    Mgreen201 New Member

    I knlw there not cheap but the hilti collated battery gun is well worth it. Never jams and lasts for ever. Makita were good but seem to have jamming problem these days also dewalt has common issues . ( from what I hear )
     
  14. Mgreen201

    Mgreen201 New Member

    What type of £ is out there for 2 bed and 3 bed house bashing ..
     
  15. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    :rolleyes: Don't be stupid ***.................there is no such thing as a "good chopsaw for £50" Yes you can buy one for that, but it will be a pile of **** and might struggle to get you through a week. On a building site though, you defo do not want to be using any sort of expensive top rated gear......................simply because it will be stolen before you have finished your breakfast.
     
    AlvyChippy likes this.
  16. Mgreen201

    Mgreen201 New Member

    If you leave tools at ur *** they will walk. The evolution chopsaw is great for site work. It's cheap and cheerful ur not exactly doing finishing. It's also very light wieght ..well worth a look
     
    AlvyChippy likes this.
  17. Mgreen201

    Mgreen201 New Member

    http://www.evolutionstore.co.uk/reconditioned/cgrade/rage3b-110v.php

    All great for what there needed for just use a decent blade infact the blade costs about same
     
  18. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    If you have any cordless Festool gear, it is worth looking at their cordless circular saw and the FSK rail. Really good at cutting square section and wider timber like skirting.

    The other thing that I find speeds up framing are clamping squares https://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+hand-...mping-square-pack-of-12-rutlands+dk7218pack12

    plus get yourself a pair of Irwin Xtrene Quick grip clamps. Really useful to hold the clamping squares in place and also pull timbers back in line.

    Two approaches to framing - build in situ piece by piece or build on trestles and put the whole thing in one go. There are many pros and cons to each approach.
     
  19. Robert2301

    Robert2301 New Member

    I think some sites don't like you to build a frame and put it up which is probably alot faster
     
  20. jimoz

    jimoz New Member

    This is how I usually do it although have started to recently build in situ. I don't think framing on the deck then lifting up is faster I just used to prefer it. That being said I'm usually either on day work or building for myself so not under the gun to get it finished. What's others preferences? Pros and cons?
     

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