8.5kw shower cable

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by lvlouse, May 13, 2018.

  1. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    No qualms even though the o.p. is running 10mm through 2m of insulation?
     
  2. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    In all the years doing electrics I have seen all sorts, from melted consumer units and socket outlets to charred joists where halogen downlights have nearly set fire to them but I dont think I have ever seen an overheated cable because it was run through a bit of insulation. The worst I have seen where a cable has overheated is when two single ovens were wired from the outlet plate in a piece of 1mm that looped from one oven to the next, it was a little bit brown and brittle but still worked ok.

    I would imagine there is quite a lot of redundancy in the current carrying capacity of cables and its not the disaster waiting to happen that we think it is.
     
  3. Hollie

    Hollie Member

    As per you've got involved with a thread and haven't noticed the posts to which my reply relates. If you care to actually read the posts then you will see my post says if the CCC is sufficient taking installation method etc into account.
     
    Risteard likes this.
  4. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    No you didn't. This is what you said.

    If I brought a fully populated CCU which had a 40A circuit breaker and the situation is as described in this post then I would have no qualms using it.

    Therefore by logic you have included the 2m insulation mentioned in the o.p. - This is the situation described.

    You would be happy to run 10mm through 2m insulation then? In this situation? On a 40a breaker?
     
  5. Hollie

    Hollie Member

    You must be a complete donut....you have just quoted my post which says "and the situation is described as I n this post"...The big clue in that sentence is the bit where it says "this post". Thi post said " If the cable has a sufficient CCC taking installation method etc into account. The 40A circuit breaker will be sufficient for faultprotection, overload protection is not needed as its physically impossible to exceed the CCC of the cable. If I brought a fully populated CCU which had a 40A circuit breaker and the situation is as described in this post then I would have no qualms using it. This knowledge is the difference between someonewho actually knows what they are doing and someone who thinks they do....@Bazza-spark, I hope you don't take offence. ;) Do you not understand what this post means?
     
    Risteard likes this.
  6. Risteard

    Risteard Well-Known Member

    Because he is dumb.
     
    Hollie likes this.
  7. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Hollie, this is what you said.

    If I brought a fully populated CCU which had a 40A circuit breaker and the situation is as described in this post then I would have no qualms using it.

    This is the situation described.

    The existing 10mm t/e from the fuse box has been reused, this would be about 10m long and in the loft travels through maybe 2m of insulation which having looked on these forums seems to be a non issue for 10mm t/e cable.

    Do me a favour mate, don't try and back peddle this one.

    Personally I wouldn't run 10mm on a 40a breaker through 2m insulation, but perhaps that is the difference between someone how knows what they are doing and someone who does not. Are you a spark?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
  8. Risteard

    Risteard Well-Known Member

    You are completely clueless about everything Coloumb.
     
  9. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Ah right, @Hollie means something totally different? Can you expand then please?
     
  10. Hollie

    Hollie Member

    are you just completely choosing to ignore the bit of the post you are quoting that says "this post"? Do you understand what "this post" means? For the benefit of the doubt "this post" started with, and I quote "If the cable has a sufficient CCC taking installation method etc into account". Do you not understand this bit or are you choosing to completely ignore this and miss quote my posts?
     
    Risteard likes this.
  11. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Hollie, this is what you said. Again as you are a little hard of thinking/reading. I've made the important bit a different colour for you. I AM NOT misquoting your posts.

    This is what you said...

    If I brought a fully populated CCU which had a 40A circuit breaker and the situation is as described in this post then I would have no qualms using it.

    This is the situation described.

    The existing 10mm t/e from the fuse box has been reused, this would be about 10m long and in the loft travels through maybe 2m of insulation which having looked on these forums seems to be a non issue for 10mm t/e cable.

    Does this situation have "a sufficient CCC taking installation method etc into account"? A 10mm cable through 2m of insulation?

    Do me a favour mate, don't try and back peddle this one.

    Personally I wouldn't run 10mm on a 40a breaker through 2m insulation, but perhaps that is the difference between someone how knows what they are doing and someone who does not.

    So please, are you a spark?
     
  12. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    No comment on overall suitability, correctness of installation or good practice:

    Try the TLC Voltage drop calculator https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Technical/Charts/VoltageDrop.html

    8.5kW of T&E, Clipped direct with a 25 deg ambient temperature, non-lighting and 10m length. You will be surprised to see what it suggests!
     
    Heat likes this.
  13. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    10mm can carry 70 odd amps in a normal situation yet people are scared to put it on a 40A MCB because it runs through 2M of insulation, do me a favour. If a cable doesn't get warm to begin with then it hasn't got any heat to lose so running it through insulation wont make any difference.
     
  14. Heat

    Heat Active Member

    And I note cable length (clipped direct) has to reach the length of 29m before it has to be 6mm T&E and 43m before it is specified at 10mm, according to that calculator.
     
  15. Hollie

    Hollie Member

    you are and at the same time making yourself look rather foolish...you are ignoring the fact the post says "in this post" you can read the quoted post that's says "in this post". You are choosing to highlight in red the bit that says "situation is as described" and ignoring the three words that follow that say "in this post". The whole sentence says "If I brought a fully populated CCU which had a 40A circuit breaker and the situation is as described in this post then I would have no qualms using it". Do you understand what as described in this post means?

    Described means To give an account of in speech or Writing

    This means
    Used for a person, object, idea, etc. to show which one is referred to

    A post on a forum is part of conversation in the form of posted messages.

    I hope this finally clears it up for you and you can stop making yourself utterly stupid by quoting part of my post and intentionally taking it out of context to aid your embarrassment.

     
    Risteard likes this.
  16. Risteard

    Risteard Well-Known Member

    He's used to making a fool of himself as with the time he wrongly advised people about the scope in law of Restricted Electrical Works in Ireland.
     
    Hollie likes this.
  17. Bazza-spark

    Bazza-spark Well-Known Member

    @Risteard @Hollie you are both missing the point because you are clueless.

    The original cicruit was wired in 10mm. Hence the person who did the original design had designed the circuit for a 10mm cable, not 6mm. You are now saying it's ok to drop to 6mm.

    @Hollie if you bought a CU popukated with 60A breakers would you use one of those as well, or would you change it for the correct size?

    Pair of argumentative chancers you are.
     
  18. Hollie

    Hollie Member

    Erm......you are the one that can't get their head around basic principals or interpret regulations correctly. You and your little mate are now using the same tactics. You had your behind smacked because you said you would never use a 40A breaker on a 6mm cable...this is not just referring to the opening post, it's a generalisation as a whole that you would never use 6mm a 40A breaker. You was given an example of a fixed load appliance and how overload protection could be omitted. Your mate @Coloumb then decided to jump aboard and made a complete mockery of himself. You are now trying to do something very similar and quote posts or part of out of context. Risteards posts are clearly in reply to your generalisation that you said about how you would never install a 6mm cable on a 40A breaker. You obviously feel embarrassed/ashamed of the content you've posted as you are now resorting to choosing a post that is not quoting the opening post but quoting the post about you never installing a 6mm cable on a 40A breaker, then trying to make it relevant to another post that has nothing to do with it. You have been found out,got your **** served to you on a plate which is obvious for everyone who reads this to see and now trying to pull underhand tactics out the bag to try and save some face. I'm a chancer?....yeah alright mate, pot kettle black!
     
    Risteard likes this.
  19. Risteard

    Risteard Well-Known Member

    You are the clueless dangerous nincompoop.
     
  20. lvlouse

    lvlouse New Member

    c'mon guys, no need to argue. i have no doubt that its gonna be fine, the shower on its original route has been fine for years. if anything i've improved the situation by reducing the insulation cover from about 4-5m to 2m, not much but every little helps.
     
    Heat likes this.

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