basin waste just won't stop leaking

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by twice_knightly, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. IF the source of the water leak was the tap and IF the waste pipe that the first cove replaced was actually ok, then you should only have to pay for whatever the call-out charge was for the second guy to turn off the valves for the tap.

    You explain that to them nicely, and they should refund anything you've paid them over that amount.

    If they don't, you tell them you will sue via moneyclaim.org, and you will add the cost of the ruined towels to the sum they owe you.

    You will almost certainly win.


    I don't understand, tho' - did they actually fix the problem? Replace the taps or whatever? I'm afraid I don't understand half your post.
     
  2. Plumberbish

    Plumberbish Active Member

    Plumbers mait sausage between top of basin and underside of waste, then smaller sausage under basin, then a poly washer, then back it...jobs a good'n ;)
     
  3. oscar67

    oscar67 New Member

  4. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

  5. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    Don't get it on your hands though :)
     
    retiredsparks and KIAB like this.
  6. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    I don't, as I wear Ansell Touch n` Tuff Green Nitrile Gloves or similar when using sealant & foam, & messier plumbing jobs, easier way to keeep your handies clean.:)
     
  7. Pollowick

    Pollowick Screwfix Select

    Still leaking after 10 years! Get a new plumber.
     
  8. graham Feest

    graham Feest New Member

    Well twice nightly I am a bit like you. Only my sledge hammer is really getting ready to smash this basin off the wall. I have like you tried every combination and still the waste leaks. I am really at the end of my tether. I have never had this problem before and have spent now two days trying to resolve it. Can't understand where the water is penetrating from. The sink fills with water with a pug in and is fine it is when you let it go the problems start between the sink and its washers and nut underneath.
     
  9. CGN

    CGN Screwfix Select

    Have you got the correct waste for your basin. Slotted if it has overflow, un-slotted if not. Going against the grain, :rolleyes: I put a good bead of silicon on the top, push waste in, good bead of silicon under the basin around waste thread, put washer on, bit more silicon, then put nut on and tighten up. Clean of excess neatly with some wonder wipes and job done. Never have a leak :) I'll prob get heckled at for that method :cool:
     
  10. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    Done it same way for many years, I use Plumber Gold brilliant sealant for sealing / setting basin outlets ,etc,used for everything,when installing taps, I will put a bead on them along with the washer, toilet syphon gets bead on a bedded,not sure if our host stocks, but the competitor does.

    http://www.everbuild.co.uk/plumbers-gold
     
  11. furious_customer

    furious_customer Screwfix Select

    Pass the lump hammer - I am having the same problem!

    I recenty cracked my basin, so got an identical replacement from the supplier.
    Removed the pop-up waste from old one and fitted it in place with a sausage of plumers-mait under the flange and then a smaller one underneath - added the washer and tightened up the nut - and with the basin full of water and the plug-hole closed I get a small but definite leak. Rermoved it all, cleaned everything up and tried the same, but this time with 3 turns of PTFE on the threads of the waste - same result.

    Tried the basin-mate cone shaped washer and it did stop the leak from the basin, but wouldn't let me tighten the bottle-trap sufficiently to prevent this leaking, so I am ruling that out as a solution.

    It seems that in the original one the waste flange was on a bed of silicon, but would rather not do this because if it still leaks then it will be a nightmare to remove.

    Any suggestions (other then a lump hammer and a copy of Thomsons directory to find a plumber).
     
  12. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    I use the method described by CGN in post 29, above, except I don't even bother with the washer between the basin and the nut underneath (and certainly not anything supplied to go under the waste's top flange inside the bowl).

    The water leaking is under virtually no pressure, so it's simply a matter of making sure everything is clean and dry before assembly and using sufficient sealant.

    There's nothing wrong with using silicone sealant (my usual one is Screwfix's No-Nonsense sanitary) and you can always get the waste out if you need to by taking the nut off and unscrewing it back upwards with your water pump pliers if it won't simply push up.
     
  13. furious_customer

    furious_customer Screwfix Select

    Thanks Joe.
    I was more worried about getting the Silicon off the basin if it still leaks and I need to go back to square-one.
     
  14. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    I normally remove old sealant with a Stanley knife and a sharp wood chisel. As long as you're careful, it doesn't really mark the ceramic (or acrylic in baths, etc). Then I clean the surface with meths (which, if you're as old as me, immediately brings back memories of Mamod steam models - happy days!) You've not got to get every bit off, as long as it's smooth.

    But if you're careful, it won't leak, so you won't need to get it off again.
     
  15. furious_customer

    furious_customer Screwfix Select

    Ok, finally managed to stop this leaking just using plumbers-mait and not resorting to Silicon.

    For the benefit of anyone else who might have this problem in the future, there are 2 important points that were catching me out.

    1) When you push the waste into the basin (with plumbers-mait wrapped under the flange), you need to push it down *very* firmly (and evenly) until no more putty can ooze out. Then grab the waste from below and pull it down as hard as you can. If the basin isn't fitted at this stage, turn it upside down and lift the whole thing up by the threaded part of the waste only. This will bed the waste into the putty nice and firmly and you will be water-tight at this stage.

    2) When tightening the back-nut make sure that the waste *does not move* during tightening. Mine was a slotted waste so I did this with a screwdriver jammed into the slot. If the wate moves then you have broken the water-tight seal and you need to strip it down, clean it off and start again.

    Hope that helps anyone who has trouble with this in future!
     
  16. masterdiy

    masterdiy Screwfix Select

    Guys, I had this now a couple of times, particularly after removing said sink waste, and or fitting new waste.

    See first image. This is what you normally fit with supplied washers.

    The item missing is image two. This jelly type washer sits on top of the big bottom nut & then seals the thread as you tighten it up. (the jelly washer needs winding up the tread like its a nut)

    So with the jelly washer, all you need is a smear of plumbers mate on the waist fitting , & a couple of turns with ptfe tape. (in fact last time I used the jelly washer, I didn't use tape at all)

    The idea is the jelly washer seals the thread, cos thats where the water is coming down.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. furious_customer

    furious_customer Screwfix Select

  18. masterdiy

    masterdiy Screwfix Select

    Yes, you still need the jelly washer. It leaks down the thread.
     
  19. furious_customer

    furious_customer Screwfix Select

    Ah, ok - so you should be this in addition to a waste kit?
     
    masterdiy likes this.
  20. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    I refer the honourable members to Post 32, above. I use silicone under the top flange of the waste and all around the gap between the basin and the waste underneath before I screw up the nut by hand and nip it up with my water pump pliers. Some sealant always gets onto the threads and the nut, which is good. Any final cleaning up is done with a bit of loo roll soaked in meths.

    It works, and there's no need for extra bits or any great pressure on the parts. I'm struggling to think of the last time I used Plumbers' Mait for anything.
     

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