Bathroom tiling

Discussion in 'Tilers' Talk' started by Frothyman, Apr 24, 2005.

  1. The toilet should be mechanically fixed to the floor.

    I'm finding the manufacturers are getting far more inventive with the pan fixings now, and it's quite unusual for me to fit a toilet which simply has two holes that are screwed directly to the floor.

    Most noe have very well designed fixing systems that often involve a self tapping bolt fixing directly into the floor to a predetermined height. A threaded bolt is then passed through the pan hole horizontally into a threaded eye.

    About time a system like this was developed, and there really is no substitute for fixing a pan this way.
     
  2. handyman.

    handyman. New Member

    Mj, I had to fix a toilet there it was poorly screwed into chipboard and siliconed. Customer stood on toilet seat to change curtains and ripped the hole thing out.

    If there were decent screws holding it down this may have not occured. Not screwing toilet pan down sounds like a botch to me.
     
  3. mj

    mj Guest

    If its siliconed properly on to correctly fixed tiles, it won't budge. It may not be as good as a mechanical fixing, but a bodge it is not.
    There are many instances in bathrooms with the advent of under floor heating where it is not possible to screw into the floor.
     
  4. handyman.

    handyman. New Member

    MJ, Fair point about the underfloor heating.

    Well mudster, how do you get round that one?? ;)

    Interesting stuff this toilet talk:)
     
  5. mj

    mj Guest

    is it our right to leave plumbers bonus on newly fitted pan?
     
  6. Jason123

    Jason123 New Member

    MJ, I have used every type of silicon sealant there is, I have never seen one that could anchor a toilet pan to the tiles. If you even used an anchor resin which would work, you get a 26 stone fat lass boogying on the pan and shes going pull up the 4 tiles its anchored to, I could see what you meant Handy about pre-cutting tiles, 4 12mm holes about where you need them. Then again, back marking is the way Ive always done it, slide toilet into position mark holes, remove pan drill holes and away you go. I did leave the toilet in situ once, long 6mm sds on hammer stop, continued til it popped thru tile, then screws put in. MJ what stuff do you use, I havent come across it, all silicon sealants I have used set like soft to hard rubber.
     
  7. Jason123

    Jason123 New Member

    Was it M3 that says about the ply splitting, why not use marine ply, thats what I used, MrsJ123 insists on cleaning tiled areas with a mix of Arbuckles concentrated grout remover, bleach actually, once grout has deteriorated, water can penetrate base, never had ply splitting.
     
  8. handyman.

    handyman. New Member

    jason123, what about the underfloor heating question???

    Are you really salty or something??? Marine ply?? Whats the point???
     
  9. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    When laying the underfloor heating just mark out the position of the W.C and then dont lay the heating under the Pan
     
  10. handyman.

    handyman. New Member

    But I wanted a warm botty :)
     
  11. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    I bet you do, doesn't your other half (John) like a cold bottie? ;)
     
  12. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    When laying the underfloor heating just mark out the
    position of the W.C and then dont lay the heating
    under the Pan


    And while you're at it, mark out where your screws will go and cut out a bit of tile before fitting it so you can screw straight down to the floor. :)



    Handyandy - really
     
  13. Jason123

    Jason123 New Member

    Marine ply doesnt swell and split, seemed insignificant extra to pay, for better ply, go on then, what are the disadvantages of marine ply??????????????:)
     
  14. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    Yes I suppose you could HA !

    Smart a**e;)

    [Edited by: Forum Moderator]
     
  15. Jason123

    Jason123 New Member

    Bstyle, what silicon do you hold your bathroom refits with, I wouldn't trust silicon to hold a small mirror to the wall never mind a toilet pan, comments please:)
     
  16. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    I go through shed loads of silicone sealant, I used to use only Bal or Dow corning 785 but realsied that you are quite simply paying for the name. I found this out by talking to a new supplier that sells me silicone for a fraction of the price and it's actually made by Dow Corning and just rebadged. My supplier for all my plumbing fittings and silicone is Pulsar Direct. It's trade only and the prices are excellent.
     
  17. bathstyle

    bathstyle Active Member

    By the way if you ever need to stick a mirror to the wall you mustn't use standard silicone, only mirror silicone. The standard silicone attacks the back of the mirror and eventually shows through to the mirror
     
  18. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    .....and notice the multiple uses of the word 'sealant'.

    Primarily 'Silicone Sealant' is just that. A sealant.
    Not a glue for fixing.

    (I won't mention the many things that I have 'glued' with silicon sealant)

    Most, if not all, will state that they have x% flexibility, so for fixing things like toilet pans that will rock when sat on for instance, silicon fixing is no good at all.

    The material to be sealed with silicon should be firmly fixed by other means.

    (Just for those who might not know, not trying to teach egg-sucking.....:))




    Handyandy - really
     
  19. mj

    mj Guest

    You don't alway know exactly where the heating is, especially if your second fixing a bathroom & you didn't tile it.
    From years of experience of siliconing pans in showrooms (with Dow Corning 785) where they get more abuse than your average house. Ensuring all surfaces are clean & a little silicone is squirted in under the pan. They just don't move, we've stood (2 of us @14 stone) on them & tried to tip em up. As said before i prefer to mechanical fix if possible, but when circumstances have made it risky to drill then i've stuck them without any problems. I've checked some of these pans a year or so later when doing other work at the properties & theyr'e all solid as a rock
     

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