Before improving Elect' outlets and adding Cat6, worth upgrading Consumer Unit?

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by BikerChris, Aug 30, 2018.

  1. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    150mm is normally enough, although if you can get 200/300 then even better. If you choose armoured Cat5e/6 then you will have a partial screen - which will also help.

    Dig three trench - 300+ wide put power on one side and data on the other and look at using 40 or 50 diameter flexi - so no joins and can be easily manoeuvred around.
     
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  2. DanielQ

    DanielQ Member

    I'm a Comms Engineer and I installed Cat5E in my own house a few weeks ago. Cat5e do 1Gbps.

    10Gbps network equipment on cooper is very very expensive. At this speed it would be more cost effective to install fibre.
     
  3. BikerChris

    BikerChris Member

    Cheers for confirming mate, very much appreciated, I'll make it a foot just to be sure. A perfect plan though, thank you very much.
     
  4. BikerChris

    BikerChris Member

    Cheers for finding the time to respond Daniel, really appreciate it.

    Do you think the cost of network gear for Cat6/10Gb would be more than fibre? I'm just trying to save money but also time laying it all through the house. Come to think of it, upstairs ain't going to need 10, as that is just for kids.
     
  5. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    Or run an armoured one. In seriousness, would you run two mains supplies too, just in case?
     
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  6. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    Cat5e is still by far the most popular choice for distribution, with fibre back bones between areas or buildings. Fibre is great when you’re worried about interference. A gigabit switch with a couple fibre ports are relatively cheap these days, with the fibre modules coming down in price. The cable can be ordered pre ended, or someone can terminate it for you.
     
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  7. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member

    You can still run Cat6 and use Gbit network equipment - it will all ow you to upgrade in future if 10Gbit equipment drops in price and the differential between the two will be small in the overall scheme.


    Cat5e is more likely to fail, not through cutting or external damage. I personally have four Cat5e cables running from my switch, about 25m, to a face plate. All were Gbit at one time, now one has a cable break and will only provide 100Mb connectivity.
     
  8. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    I would say that is down to poor installation methods or cheap dodgy cable. It doesn't just fail. When doing a hundred or so points in an office, should I be pulling a spare just in case? If installed correctly, with care, respecting the cable, they don't fail.
     
  9. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Having bends too sharp/tight is one reasone Cat 5e fails, had it happen here.:oops:
     
  10. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    Exactly. Respect the cable. When doing installs of hundreds, it’s rare to get a faulty one. When one doesn’t pass, it’s more than likely terminations.
     
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  11. Pollowick

    Pollowick Well-Known Member


    I know exactly where it is on a vertical run that was put in place and not pulled through. And not cheap cable either.
     
  12. Lectrician

    Lectrician Screwfix Select

    What make is written on the cable?
     
  13. DanielQ

    DanielQ Member


    If you are having doubts, install cat6.

    Search for "Excel Cat6" It should be around £90 for 305meters.

    You could terminate them with cat5e modules to save some money. In 10 years time you could just upgrade the modules on the wall, switch, etc...If needed...

    Cost of switches with modules working on Cat6 at 10Gbps are much more expensive than fibre.
     
  14. BikerChris

    BikerChris Member

    Sorry for the delay people, work and all that :-/
    Lectrician / HappyHacker - so I guess it's either a case of redundancy with 2 cables, or one armoured...not sure how much armoured would hike the price up, perhaps not compared with 2 cables. I'm not looking for the cheapest solution, just the one that gives me the least agg over time :)
    Don't think I'm important enough to have 2 mains supplies, I like your thinking though! It's mainly going to be used for computer equipment and occasional power tools.
    I probably wouldn't try to end cables if I used fibre, I do like the idea of protecting from interference although I do live in a low density housing area, which should help a little bit. I'm going to look into prices, cheers mate, really appreciated.
    Pollowick - I think cat6 will be the minimum I go for, cheers very much for the follow up mate.
    KIAB - bends will be avoided for sure :)
    Hello again DanielQ - Cheers for coming back mate, much appreciated. That all sounds good to me, and that Cat6 is cheaper than I thought, I could do the whole house with that I reckon.

    You've been really help you lot, I really am grateful for all your wise words.
     
  15. Coloumb

    Coloumb Well-Known Member

    Don't forget you need 50mm min separation between your LV and ELV cables unless separated with a plastic barrier. I used a smallish diameter flexible plastic conduit into which I could fit four cat 5 cables. You will need to use the minimum size you can get away with as your almost definitely going to be drilling through joists so you will want to be keeping your holes size as small as possible.
     
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  16. BikerChris

    BikerChris Member

    Thanks mate, really useful tip. I shouldn't be going through joists, just an external wall then straight underground and off to the outbuilding. Outbuilding will probably have shallow foundation then block laid flat for walls. I was going to just have a timber outbuilding, but there will be things in there worth nicking and I want to keep it at a controlled temp. Cheers again!
     

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