Best budget chainsaw

Discussion in 'Tool Talk' started by BiancoTheGiraffe, Jan 13, 2021.

  1. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Active Member

    Electric or petrol?

    Anyone got any recommendations?

    I've got a small tree stump to remove and a few similar jobs to do over the next year or so.

    Should I just go with a "disposable" Titan saw for £40 or the £100 Makita equivalent?
     
  2. Muzungu

    Muzungu Screwfix Select

    I bought the previous iteration of the cheapo 240v Titan a few years back. No problems with it at all. Took out a 12 inch diameter trunk with ease. Used it since then for various bit and pieces from clearing bushes to cutting up pallets. As long as you get a good chain once the original is blunt (unless you get into sharpening) it will be fine for light work.
     
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  3. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Active Member

    Cheers for the tip!

    Considering its currently in SF at £35 less than a one day hire at my local shop, it doesn't seem like I need to think again...

    It's only for 3-4" stumps anyway
     
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  4. Roys

    Roys New Member

    For just a few stumps go cheap, obviously the more you pay the better the quality and so longevity of the components, also less vibrations with the more expensive models.
    As above once the cuttings are no longer slivers of wood but saw dust then it is time for a sharp chain, usually about 1/2 a shift before a wee tickle with the chain file is required, unless you hit dirt, stones etc.
    Don’t forget to buy chainbar oil and keep it topped up.
     
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  5. welshblue

    welshblue Member

    Me personally I'd go for petrol if weight isn't an issue.
    You'll have more power = cleaner cutting = safer ... as in you're not pressing to force the saw through, especially if it's lost it's edge.
    Plus the anti vibration will be better I would have thought

    The 89.99 Titan petrol has mixed reviews but some of the bad ones are down to user error.

    Whichever ... stay safe ;):)
     
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  6. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Active Member

    Cheers for the replies.

    I picked up the £40 Titan this morning... Figured that with a years warranty and a £15 chain included I couldn't really go wrong!

    Not used it yet, but got it set up and I'm pretty surprised by the feel and quality of it, doesn't feel like a bargain basement tool at all!
     
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  7. welshblue

    welshblue Member

    At that price I guess it was a no brainer.

    Have fun ... you'll end up cutting down more than you thought you needed it for
     
  8. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Active Member

    As long as it's only timber and not arms and legs!

    (I did check the safety cutouts work properly as soon as I got it!)

    If I get a lot of use out of it I'll probably splash out on a petrol model by Makita
     
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  9. welshblue

    welshblue Member

    He he

    Don't worry in 37 years I've only lost a thumb finger, and a nice scar on my leg.

    one tip after watching online reviews (never used an electric one myself) after running the saw for a few minutes, the chain will stretch from first use ... three videos, they never tensioned it straight away and ran it hanging loose. Doesn't cut clean then. Plus when tensioning, loosen the one nut, press the bar and chain up - then tension - then tighten the nut ... that way it'll retain tension

    Seems a good tool
     
  10. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    Bargain! I'm going to get one even though I don't need it!! Well no such thing as too many tools is there?
     
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  11. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Active Member

    Certainly isn't!

    Unfortunately there is such thing as "too little space to store them"! (Very much on my mind today as the newly dug foundations for my new shed are flooded, the shed itself is in pieces in my garage and kitchen while it dries out, and the flipping tree stump (that I was expecting to remove with my new chainsaw!) is still where my new tool store should be!
     
  12. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    Life's not always easy for us blokes is it!? And often minimal support and sympathy from 'her indoors'. Battle on regardless.
     
  13. ramseyman

    ramseyman Screwfix Select

    OP - if it's a stump you're removing don't try and cut anywhere near the roots - you only have to just touch your saw on the soil and the chain is blunt. Best to leave the 'stump' a bit high so you can get some rocking motion on it if you are removing completely rather than cutting off just above ground level.. All depends on size of stump of course.
     

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