best method to build large gates

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by jack101, May 10, 2012.

  1. Tembo11

    Tembo11 Member

    How you want to build them is going to be governed by how the authority (English Herritage I presume) will likely say they have to be constructed to comply with the listing (Grade 1 / Grade 2 etc)

    You don' mention having checked with them first. I suggest you do
     
  2. Tembo11

    Tembo11 Member

    the ply sheet is to small at 2.44m x 1.22m to cover 1.6m x 2.7m
     
  3. Tembo11

    Tembo11 Member

    two gate manuf I know of
    Cannock Gates - I've seen their finished products on their display site in Cannock and

    Jacksons Fencing
     
  4. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    its nothing to do with them and im in scotland. so it would be historic scotland.
     
  5. Tembo11

    Tembo11 Member

    If the hinges are attached to the rails you can get away without using mortice and tennon to attach the stiles
     
  6. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    i had planned to cut the plywood to suit the size of the gate. i suppose its similar to cutting the kiln dried timber to suit the size of the gate your making.
     
  7. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    Building it out of ply is a stupid costly time consuming idea, you obviously dont have * clue or the skills, why not just stick with a good old fashioned tried and tested method its a * gate *

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator
     
  8. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    i obviously do have a clue, the * gatemakers website confirms my idea is feasible. using ply to strengthen the metal frame is a great idea. the good old fashioned methods are prone to warp and twist! its not just a gate, it is an entrance to a grand building. you think £60 for plywood is costly? you must be struggling!

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator
     
  9. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    3 layers 12mm ply = 9 sheets for both gates = £270
    I am struggling that much I might just lay my 4 lads off later.
    You're over thinking this, its not rocket science, gates have been built with m&t for years.......... There is more chance of your ply twisting over time than a traditionally made gate.....
    Each to his own.
     
  10. Tembo11

    Tembo11 Member

    So here's the same limits of how the alteration is done from Historic Scotland then
    see attached

    Message was edited by: Screwfix Moderator
     
  11. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    its £10 per sheet X 9 sheets = £90!
    also you will notice that using the metal box section, it will only require 6 sheets of ply and the metal is only £60. and the metal will not warp - guaranteed. just because something has been done a certain way for years does not mean there isnt a better way of doing it. people used hammer and nails before paslodes came along! tightened screws by hand before screw guns came along.  i sugesst you move with the times. i wish i only had 4 employees to deal with :)
     
  12. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    i have listed building consent, the building was in such a poor state they would accept whatever i proposed. i can confirm that historic scotland are not interested and even if they were it would not relate to the construction of the gate - only the finish look of the gate. also when i have asked historic scotland for advice in the past they have sugested i contact local planners first, i have done this already in this case.
     
  13. Jack, what size of steel box-section would you use if going the 'metal' route, and how would you finish the top edges of the gates?
     
  14. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    40mm box section 2.5mm thick steel. add one layer of play each side = 25mm add one layer of 16mm redwood lining each side = 32mm
    mo more or less 100mm thick gates finished off with a 100mmx25mm hardwood strip on all 4 sides.

    the gates will be designed a bit like doors and will close onto chunky door checks.

    im really confident with this plan - i will let you know how i get on. i will time how long it takes and get back to you all.
     
  15. I would have thought that the steel-frame plan is the most stable of them all - I'd be astonished if your gates would warp! You fitting a diagional cross-bracing in steel as you would timber? That, along with the 12mm ply each side will be incredibly strong.

    Please post piccies of the build. Genuinely interested, and it might even shut up a few people... ;)
     
  16. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    I still can't see how 3 sheets of ply will work for each gate. You need to go edge to edge. The height of the ply is not enough to do that, and even if it did, the width wouldn't.

    If the ply is put long-ways across, you would need 5 boards.

    'Coz no mention of any centre box-section 'sections'.


    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  17. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    yes i would be using central box sections, im thinking it would be 2 uprights and 4 horizontals in total per leaf. the size is slightly smaller than i originally planned so its going to be even easier.
     
  18. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    i dont pplan to fit any cross bracers, i would like to but it becomes awkward and time consuming compared to doing it in wood. the ply wood should be strong enough and i will glue in 40mm timber blocks at the corners for extra strength. the ply wood joint will have 40mm timber inserts as well all fully glued with polyurethane glue.
     
  19. jack101

    jack101 New Member

    i made the gates today, still got to add the lining board and the trim around the 4 edges. it worked really well, the gates were quick to make and seem to be very stiff and square and flat.[​IMG]
     
  20. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    They're dropping on the top hinges a bit!


    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     

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