Best tool to sand down render bonding plaster

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by DIY_Has123, Feb 13, 2021.

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  1. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    Can anyone please recommend a suitable tool to sand down a good couple cm's (like half an inch or so) of internal cement render, bonding or plaster.

    I have a basic detail sander like this with rough 40 grit papers:

    https://www.toolstation.com/search?q=50134

    But takes forever to sand down. I need something more aggressive like angle grinder maybe that will remove a good few millimetres with just a few strokes.

    But not sure what to get...can anyone please advise?

    Maybe recommendations from Screwfix...
     
  2. I-Man

    I-Man Screwfix Select

    What exactly are you sanding??? And what ever it is... Half an inch!!?? Why so much
     
  3. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    A mix of plaster bonding and sand/cement.

    My bedroom wall was plastered around twenty years ago and whoever done it decided to slap on a load of bonding along the top with no care for levelling the wall.

    I decided to level out bottom with sand cement but now its all a messed up so decided to board it up much easier. But before I do want to get the areas which protrude out as flat as possible.
     
  4. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    I could hack off with hammer and chisel but that would remove larger chunks and get messier.
     
  5. I-Man

    I-Man Screwfix Select

    I honestly think that would be easier then trying to sand it down! Anyway, your going to board with plasterboard I assume, so the adhesive will fill out the remaining gaps
     
  6. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    Surely an abrasive sander would be easier. Something designed for concrete for instance.

    Thinking of getting this:
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/mac-alli...ngle-grinder-220-240v/970gf?_requestid=211364

    And use with 40 grit flap disk?
     
  7. I-Man

    I-Man Screwfix Select

    And you think that's not going to be messy?
     
    Jord86 and WillyEckerslike like this.
  8. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    You know what mate never mind!
     
  9. WillyEckerslike

    WillyEckerslike Screwfix Select

    @I-Man is completely right. The dust you will create will be horrendous. A 40 grit flap wheel won't last long against a cement render and if it's bonding plaster you won't be able to see after a few minutes as the dust will form a cloud that pervades throughout the house and settles onto and into everything. You'll be finding it for days or weeks possibly. Imagine getting a bag of plaster or cement and gently feeding it all through a fan.....

    Hammer and chisel is your best bet but you can do that mechanically with an SDS drill with chipping function and a scabbling bit.
    https://www.toolstation.com/heller-sds-plus-mortar-chisel/p39281

    Edit: If the dust doesn't bother you then use one of these instead of a flap discs - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gunpla-Diamond-Grinding-Abrasive-Concrete/dp/B075D6WN3L.
    Did I say it would be dusty....?
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2021
    I-Man, RolandK and Astramax like this.
  10. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    You aving a larf guv!...horrendous idea:confused:

    Maybe remove the lot back to the brick, re render and plaster.
     
  11. CosD

    CosD Active Member

    Invest in an SDS and a chisel bit. Great tool to have anyway and better suited for the job.
    You’ll be wise to take the advice regards sanding.
     
  12. ginger tuffs

    ginger tuffs Screwfix Select

    goggles mask and a sharp shovel
     
  13. stevie22

    stevie22 Screwfix Select


    Willy, my man, for once you are incorrect. It won't be a few minutes before he can't see it will be a few seconds!!!

    OP this is the voice of experience!!
     
    WillyEckerslike likes this.
  14. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    Thanks! I did consider an sds drill but isn't that more heavy duty for complete demolition work with its chisel hammer function.

    I want to delicately remove top layer plaster and render without damaging the softer limer render underneath it.

    Was considering this basic entry level drill:
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/mac-alli...ds-plus-drill-220-240v/994fy?_requestid=60501

    Would this work with that scabbling bit link you sent above?
     
  15. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    If the plaster is that badly done...consider using a wallpaper steam stripper!
     
  16. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    "Delicately remove" and "scabbling" don't belong in the same dimension, even with a hammer and bolster you will damage whatever's behind especially if it's lime based so either bite the bullet and hack it all off or keep what you've got, fill and paint.
     
  17. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Screwfix Select

    I'm very glad people have talked the OP round from what initially came across as one of the worst ideas I've ever seen on this forum! :p
     
    I-Man and Astramax like this.
  18. DIY_Has123

    DIY_Has123 Member

    One of the worst ideas?!!
    Mate get real and stop blowing it out of proportion!

    How is sanding down plaster or render one of the worst ideas you even seen on this forum?

    You have bloody drywall sanders and belt sanders I have seen people use to smooth down walls before painting etc. So no not one of the "worst ideas" you've seen on this forum.

    Thank you everyone else for your valuable contribution and replies.
     
  19. BiancoTheGiraffe

    BiancoTheGiraffe Screwfix Select

    It's a light hearted attempt at humour mate... Sorry that you missed it...

    I have a dry wall sander, I end up in a cloud of dust everytime I use it to take half a mm off a wall and that's with the extractor plugged in...

    If you want to take an inch of plaster off with a sander, then feel free to go ahead
     
    I-Man likes this.
  20. Astramax

    Astramax Super Member

    That's the 2nd worst thing I have ever heard on this forum. ;)
     
    Kingscurate likes this.

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