Bi-fold doors

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Darren Gregory, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Evening all,

    2660 internal opening.

    Planning on fitting 4 x custom made doors. weight shouldn't exceed 25kg's per door.

    Do i need to go with a rail system or can this be hung purely via hinges?

    If rail is required any recommendations on the rail brand/type?

    Thanks
     
  2. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    I would check the weight of the doors. 25kg per door, 100kg in total is a crazy amount for pure wood are you putting metal panels in them ?
     
  3. I'm making the doors myself, they will be 4 panel. 2 panel glazed. So not sure on final weight, 25 kg was a max guess.

    25kg's per door seems to be the cut off point for some of these rail systems hence that figure.

    Also is it that crazy? most of the softwood doors i've hung over the years have been around the 15/25 kg mark. Hung some shaker doors a few weeks ago they were 24kg's each.
     
  4. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    What material / thickness are you making them out of ?
     
  5. I'm open to advice/suggestions on that.

    I was planning on getting generic off the shelf type stuff. Redwood i'm guessing here, most likely from alsfords.

    I need to match the style of doors around the house which is not a stock available design.

    35mm thick
     
  6. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    The have redwood in quite a few widths, depend on the look you want. I made a pair recently using 75mm for the stiles. I prefer to rip a wider board down for each side as I find they dont warp. Plus the wider boards make the rails easier. Sometimes i make one large door to fit the opening and then rip it down to its compont doors.

    I use a table saw to cut a slot along the length of the stile. This accomodates the glass, panel and rails. Although recently I have been using "dominos" instead of tenons, costly but so much quicker

    With four doors, i prefer a rail as opening and closing is much smoother and keeps them aligned
     
    Devil's Advocate likes this.
  7. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    That's never going to work just off hinges.
     

  8. Great tips, makes sense to rip down for the sides, i can imagine picking through looking for straight timbers.

    I've looked at getting a mobile table saw as i'm finding myself getting more of these types of jobs and setting up the router is really time consuming for cutting out slots.

    Regarding the domino i have got access to one if needed so might borrow it. I use a biscuit jointer but wouldn't trust it on doors only light joins, i bet the domino has more clout.

    Will stick with fitting a rail it just makes more sense, any tips on rail system?

    i was looking at husky henderson bi-fold
     
  9. I thought that all along but i saw a job fitted on hinges today and it seemed to work, i'm guessing it wont for long....
     
    chippie244 likes this.
  10. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    It's over 8 feet long o_Oo_O
     
  11. Yeah i know, actually i don't know why i asked about the hinge thing... somebody put unwanted ideas in my head.

    Really looking for tips on the rail system.
     
  12. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I tend to use Henderson's.
     
    Darren Gregory likes this.
  13. sospan

    sospan Well-Known Member

    I have a pair of 8ft doors in a 6ft opening in my place, 5 panes of glass in each. These are on 45mm stiles

    A table saw is so usefull even with a light weight one you can accomplish an awfull lot. A heavier top is best but you do sacrifice being able to lug it around. I can easily make a raised panel door in a day, doing most of the work on a table saw. Even the raised panels come out really well

    I use dominos a lot now. So easy and accurate it almost seems like cheating on times. I just made a some large gates with an arbour on top using some large section timber. Such a nice sound as the joints slide together.

    The only time I use biscuits now, is to make up wide boards, otherwise it is dominos and pocket screws
     
  14. Cecilb70

    Cecilb70 Member

    Biscuits are better for joining panels as there quicker and more adjustable. I also find Domino's can be a bit hit and miss for accuracy at times. I also have the big domino for doors and gates.
    Where I like Domino's is for segmented curved sections using pinch dogs for clamping. Its as simple as square sections using that method( painted stuff only because of the dog holes)
     
    Darren Gregory likes this.
  15. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

    When I read 'bi-fold', I assumed Darren was fitting them in two pairs.

    He actually wanted quad-fold.

    (walks away whistling...)
     
  16. It's 2 doors each way! so 2 pairs as mentioned.
     
  17. Devil's Advocate

    Devil's Advocate Well-Known Member

    In which case, hinges will handle this peasily :).

    The only thing that will - could - fail is the doors themselves. Or the screws securing the hinges.

    Have a look at H/D S/S hinges with bearings - usually used on exterior doors - if necessary use slightly longer screws and these will not let you down.

    Probably.
     
  18. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I thought it was one set 2.6M+ wide.
     

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