Breakfront effect in worktop

Discussion in 'Kitchen Fitters' Talk' started by big_bad_bob, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. big_bad_bob

    big_bad_bob New Member

    My kitchen has been designed with a breakfront effect down one wall, ie where a couple of the units protrude by about 50mm. How do I get a laminate worktop to follow the profile of the units? Is it simply a question of joining a narrower worktop to a wider one with a straight cut, and trimming a piece of edging by hand to hide the exposed chipboard edge? Sounds a bit tricky to get the edging to fit neatly - any tips? Or is there a better way of doing it?

    Thanks,

    Bob.
     
  2. loosenup

    loosenup Member

    HI bob
    Much as you say really .. get oversize for the breakfront section and laminate edge the exposed end .. if you emplay an experienced fitter and pay the money he should be able to scribe a roll oto the edge of the worktop and you wil only see the same line as on a butt and scribe joint .. However this is quite tricky to do if no experience with a router and jig .
    Another way is to get a product called minerel ..which is a compostie worktop.. joints are near as damn it invisible .. but the worktop is 300 plus quid a length.. you sand and polish it with a solishing machine which will bring it up to a nice satin sheen finnish .. I think it is a superb product and a lot cheaper than corian with much the same appearance.
    Worktops have become a lot more specialized these days .. oh yeah and expensive
    Hope this helps.
    Phill
     
  3. big_bad_bob

    big_bad_bob New Member

    Thanks for the quick respone Phill. What exactly do you mean by scribing a roll onto the edge? Do I need a jig to do this? I was planning to get a jig to do a mason's mitre (is this also what is called butt and scribe?). I've got a decent router and I enjoy the challenge, and I've got lots of worktops offcuts to practise on, so I don't mind having a crack at it. If I make a hash of the practise pieces then I'll call in a pro!

    Cheers,

    Bob.
     
  4. Binfield Carpenter

    Binfield Carpenter New Member

    Take a look at http://www.cotops.ltd.uk and follow link to 'postformed'. They are a trade supplier of worktops and do very high quality machining of them. They use big CNC machines to cut and joint worktop sections to produce complex shapes with a continuous postformed edge. It's all done by joining sections but you have to look very closely to see the joins - quality is excellent. I have used them for several jobs and have been pleased with result every time.

    You will need to demonstrate trade credentials to order from them. They are also the main supplier to John Lewis partnership so you can also order via JL - presumably at a premium.

    Graham
     
  5. loosenup

    loosenup Member

    Excellent link Binfield.
    I have done this on site on numerous occasions with a router and jig .. and a good sharp bench saw, buscuit jointer and some E clamps. Hard to explain how to do it in text , but suffice to say one needs a little patience to get it right .. specially if 90 degree corners instead of the 22.5 degree mitres.
    Essentially .. you are using the front edge of the worktop to edge the cut end .. but it needs mitering and glueing together.. You will need to ascertain whet the depth of cut into the postforming is when using your jig .. ( mine is 23 mm )others vary in depth and shape
    hope this helps
    Phill
     
  6. big_bad_bob

    big_bad_bob New Member

    Thanks for the advice guys. I'm still not any the wiser as to how you do it Phill, but it does sound quite involved. I popped into my local kitchen place on the way home, and they had a couple that had been done using just the simple method. One looked good, the other hadn't been done so well, but I reckon with a bit of care it would look OK.

    Binfield, I'll make some enquiries with cotops - I notice they will put you in touch with a local supplier. Would that be the same Binfield near Reading? My missus lived there for a couple of months a few years back. Nice place from what I can remember......

    Cheers,

    Bob.
     
  7. Binfield Carpenter

    Binfield Carpenter New Member

    Bob, Yes it is that one - it's a good place to live and work. I rarely work more than 5 minutes away from my home in the middle of the village. All my stuff is domestic - fitted furniture, kitchens, bathrooms, doors etc. It keeps me busy.

    Graham
     

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