BREXIT, Who Is Laughing Now?

Discussion in 'Just Talk' started by palavaman, Oct 18, 2016.

  1. Rystar00

    Rystar00 Member

    I read the Mail, Sun, Express, Guardian and the Telegraph. I then filter the bullsh*t from ALL of them (including the Guardian!) and take my own view rather than regurgitate stuff that I read.

    I don't really get your point though? Of course currency traders will seek to profit from an opportunity. The same way you and I will, for example if I can buy some materials at a bigger discount and increase my mark up then I will! have you never done the same?!

    And lest we forget what actually caused the currency market volatility..... that's right you guessed it..... the people who voted to leave! There was no plummeting pound before that was there?! :rolleyes:
     
  2. PaulBlackpool

    PaulBlackpool Screwfix Select

    Yes. I don't recall the name of the proprietor of the Daily Mail being plastered on the side of a big red bus.;)
     
  3. Can you please inform me if the facts I posted about the ownership of the Daily Mail were misleading.
    If they were can you please inform me of the correct owner.
     
  4. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    well the point is the investment bankers are shorting our currency, as they do whenever a speculative event happens (see Nathan Rothschild battle of Waterloo for one example of how this works) the pound will recover especially against the euro because it will cease to exist in a few years!!!
     
  5. koolpc

    koolpc Screwfix Select

    Are not 99.9% of newspaper content bullpoo? Good for wrapping chips and cleaning ones butt but not with the same bit of paper!! lol
     
  6. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    Extract from the Finacial times

    “Shorting the pound is a consensus trade — people are desperately trying to get into it in a larger size right now,” said a London-based hedge fund manager managing several billion dollars of assets. “The hedge fund community is definitely piling into this trade today, the question it is divided on is how much of a spill over we are going to see from Brexit into other European markets.”

    Most fund managers spoke to the Financial Times on the condition of anonymity because of the stigma attached to profiting on sterling’s sharp fall and recession expectations.
     
  7. Rystar00

    Rystar00 Member

    Haha, spot on mate. Point that it's incorrect drivel remains however.

    I trust you verified the lies made by the leave campaign with the same thoroughness right?

    If so what are your views on that?
     
  8. SWBUILDERS

    SWBUILDERS Active Member

    I think they were talking about the remoaning duo , the ex prime minister and his sidekick chancellor George "shock budget"osbourne, it ok they seem to have done there own brexiting
     
  9. longboat

    longboat Screwfix Select

    Here we go again, the quivering remainers gorging themselves on negative speculation when in reality nothing has changed.... yet.
     
  10. Rystar00

    Rystar00 Member

    Shall we ignore inflationary pressure, rising prices, a plummeting pound and potentially the break up of the U.K.?

    Can't wait until the real fun starts then!
     
    Deleted member 33931 likes this.
  11. longboat

    longboat Screwfix Select

    The BOE has been striving for a moderate 2% inflation rate for years, without success. Maybe the weaker 'pound' can help deliver those targets..?
    And the drop in value is, too many economists, a long overdue inevitable correction towards it's true value.

    Wee, cranky would use any excuse under the sun to push for another indy-ref, how successful she'd be on the outcome is debatable, but, with the SNP in power another ref would happen eventually, whatever.
     
  12. longboat

    longboat Screwfix Select

    How do you see it turning out, Lanc?
    What's made you regret your decision?
     
  13. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    I never expected my country to become so supportive of a xenophobic Tory party, it wasn't what I wanted.
    Seeing the first stages of what is happening to the £ makes me very worried, and I think I'll be cashing in my investments while the Footsie is temporarily elevated.
     
  14. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    Just for information Ms Sturgeon cannot, herself, call for a referendum - it has to be the Scottish Parliament decision - and the SNP do not have an overall majority, so it will need others to support it for it to happen.
    But, as you say, I'm also sure it will eventually happen.
     
    longboat likes this.
  15. longboat

    longboat Screwfix Select

    I wouldn't include xenophobia, (the new banded about, less offensive term for racism) in any strategy that's used by the presents government as a means to effectively manage immigration figures, it's all... lefty bumph, propaganda.
    The government isn't attacking, beating or murdering foreigners.

    As for your 'investments', well, you do what you or your adviser thinks best!
     
    btiw likes this.
  16. btiw

    btiw Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure why you think this supports your argument. Do you know what shorting means?

    Let's say I think the pound is going down. I decide to short it. I find someone who wants to buy a tenner. I don't have a tenner, so I borrow a tenner from my mate and sell it for $12. I know that in a week my mate is going to ask for his tenner back, when he does then I'll go and buy a tenner because l, by then, it'll only cost me $11 because I think the pound's going down.

    It's like that but with more money and contracts instead of mates. Oh yeah, and it's a bit more financial crashy if people get too excited. If it doesn't go wrong then it makes the market a little more efficient.
     
    Rystar00 likes this.
  17. btiw

    btiw Well-Known Member

    If the Euro goes bump, it won't be like your neighbour losing his house and we'll get the benefit of a schadenfreud garage sale. It'll be like your neighbour's house exploding and taking the entire street with it. Let's hope it doesn't come to that eh? Especially as it's much bigger than us. Remember how we suffered more from the US financial crisis than the US did? If Euro sneezes we'll all catch a cold.
     
    Rystar00 likes this.
  18. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Then it follows that every monetary unit in the entire world will suffer when the Euro goes t**s up. However, investors may well see the pound as a safe bet when the Euro (almost certainly) fails.
     
  19. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Lanc, surely most of the Tory party were actually for Remain (so they're not exactly xenophobic) Immigration was top of the agenda in the referendum. I still feel we are right to be concerned about immigration. Read the newspapers and watch the news. A growing number of Germans, French, Belgian , Swedish, etc (in fact most EU countries) are majorly concerned about immigration at the moment. Should we be so different from them in these concerns? (cue the remoaners argument that immigration never hurt anyone)
     
  20. btiw

    btiw Well-Known Member

    Ha, love the optimism. That'd be nice, but no, it'll be the usual havens: Gold, US treasuries, *maybe* Swiss Francs. We're too close and will be for many years.
     

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