Cabin crew...Doors to manual.

Discussion in 'Engineers' Talk' started by malkie129, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. malkie129

    malkie129 Well-Known Member

    I just put a screw into a wall-plug,using a "screwdriver!" OMG, I thought that I had forgotten how to use one. LOL
     
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  2. Allsorts

    Allsorts Well-Known Member

    Sit down, man! Have a cuppa - you've earned it.

    Respec'.
     
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  3. Need a bigger hammer

    Need a bigger hammer Active Member

    "Wot's one o' them, then?"
     
  4. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    I bet your wrist will hurt later! :)
    Need to keep exercising your wrists
     
  5. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Have a sort out in a filing cabinet in workshop,found my Yankee screwdrivers,been years since they were last used.

    Just looked on Ebay for Yankee, & they going so cheaply now,& to think what I paid for them new,must be 30 years ago.:(
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  6. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    In the future most of us will have fat bodies and weak arms and hands due to technology.
     
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  7. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    Good thread this.
    50 years ago probably the only power tool you used was a 240volt drill, if you were lucky.
    30 plus years ago I still used a club hammer and chisel to cut most holes in walls or concrete floors, etc.
    Often the labour was mostly in the work that now we do using Power drills and breakers, in a fraction of the time.

    Before SDS drills became the norm, I struggled with some drilling - especially for 20mm holes through walls for pipes.

    I used an old auger hand brace to drill holes in floorboards for rad pipes back in the day and used a plugging chisel to hammer through tough stones in concrete walls to fit rawlplugs.

    For screwdriving it was all hand screwdrivers and manual work. Then got a Yankee Screwdriver and thought life was easy. :)
    .
    Makes you wonder how all the top quality work (that can rarely be replicated today) was done in buildings built in Victorian times and beyond?
     
  8. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    I even found a set of Rawlplug drills from 40 years ago, hammer, turn bit, hammer, youngsters would run a mile if they had to make holes that way today.:)
     
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  9. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    But in a world after a nuclear war there will be no power stations going and you will still be able to carry on working with your Rawlplug drills and Yankee Screwdriver.
     
  10. Isitreally

    Isitreally Well-Known Member


    Don't need Tech for that. :oops::oops::oops:
     
  11. malkie129

    malkie129 Well-Known Member

    Years ago,when on a job installing a flight simulator, I had to use a Rawlplug jumper to fix pipe brackets for the hydraulic pipe runs. Took me bloody days. :(
     
  12. malkie129

    malkie129 Well-Known Member

    In a similar vein,how many people remember fibre Rawlpugs? :rolleyes:
     
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  13. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    I already have :(
     
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  14. Need a bigger hammer

    Need a bigger hammer Active Member

    I remember my dad making cable clips by cutting strips off an old washing up liquid bottle, folding the strips over the wire and then nailing into the wall. I seem to remember it was actually quite a tidy job...
     
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  15. chippie244

    chippie244 Well-Known Member

    Paid a pittance and took ages.
     
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  16. Heat

    Heat Well-Known Member

    I always used them years ago.
    They were excellent on softer walls, - plenty of give in them.
    Began to get expensive.
    Dogs loved them and would sniff them out (they had a strong smell) and chew the packet if you weren’t careful :)
     
  17. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Well-Known Member

    My old Dad used to be convinced that the slot in the top of the screw was only to get them out. The Birmingham crew he worked with referred to an insertion tool for the screw as a 'Brumijum screwdriver' that's a hammer to the un initiated.:)
     
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  18. Allsorts

    Allsorts Well-Known Member

    Lawd, Bob, that gave me a flash-back to when I was in my early teens and was regularly called out to my auntie/uncle's so I could - hopefully - prevent my older cousin from going out on the tiles; the poor guy was an alcoholic from his teens.

    On this occasion the pretence was that he had a wardrobe to assemble so was expected to build this before thinking of going out for the eve'. He needed assistance with the large panels - so I was the natural port of call.

    I knew what my real job was - to stall him until the pubs were closed. No chance; he built that wardrobe - without my assistance - in twenty minutes flat.

    Screws - BAM! In they went - using a hammer. One blow each.

    When I tentatively pointed out that - perhaps - they ought to be screwed in so as not to wreck the chipboard, I still remember the glazed look in his eyes and his unchallengeable remark, delivered as a snarl; "Screws are for unscrewing..."

    I didn't argue. :oops:
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
  19. nigel willson

    nigel willson Well-Known Member

    I DO
     
  20. nigel willson

    nigel willson Well-Known Member

    Use them a lot!!! Keep your hand in!
     

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