Caravan testing

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Bradley6969, Dec 6, 2018 at 8:02 PM.

  1. Bradley6969

    Bradley6969 Member

    Right at this job with another electrician, we are doing an EICR on a fairly big caravan site, we’ve changed an old distribution unit feeding some caravans for a new one and some additional breakers, now I’m saying to him we need to do an EIC but he’s saying he’ll just put it on the EICR he’s doing with schedule of circuit details and results?
     
  2. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    Should have an install cert for the board as well as the EICR you have been asked to produce. But at the end of the day I suspect the owners just want a bit of papaer that says the installation is safe so there is someone else to blame if something goes wrong, they won't care what bit of paper establishes that.
     
  3. Bradley6969

    Bradley6969 Member

    Thanks sorry I’m only an apprentice so just want to learn a bit but my trainer seems to be a bit of a cowboy I just want to learn the proper way
     
  4. Bradley6969

    Bradley6969 Member

    Surely if he did do an EICR and not have an EIC for the board change who is to know he done it? As I’ve seen it before where people have used NICEIC stickers so you wouldn’t of known who has done the instal
     
  5. Peterdevon

    Peterdevon Active Member

    Main thing to remember in a caravan site is that hook ups / vans have to be TT unless it can proved to be TNS
     
  6. Bradley6969

    Bradley6969 Member

    Yes TNCS - PME not permitted
    Just the paper work that’s got me as he said that he doesn’t have to do EIC as it’s more paper work
     
  7. Peterdevon

    Peterdevon Active Member

    He should de a EIC
    I have seen this a lot lately on board changes on domestics no quite done to regs so they give the customer a EICR and note the faults as if it was someone else’s work.
     
  8. sparko69

    sparko69 Member

    The installation certificate actually certifies that the installation is safe and installed to 17th edition standards. No certificate means you are taking a chance even using the installation as there could be any number of problems
     
    Risteard likes this.
  9. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    So does the EICR though.
     
  10. sparko69

    sparko69 Member

    No the eicr is a report on the existing installation whereas the installation certificate is as it says on the tin,a certificate that is used to certify a new installation, the eicr is not to be used to certify a new installation.
    An eicr can be issued regardless of how unsafe the installation is. An installation certificate can only be issued if the installation is safe for continued use
     
    Risteard likes this.
  11. Comlec

    Comlec Well-Known Member

    An EIC
    • Design
    • Installation
    • Testing
    An EICR
    • Inspect and test (with limitation)
    If following an EICR work is necessary to bring the installation up to a satisfactory condition then the appropriate certificate for that work should be issued.

    Occasionally when doing an EICR I put right minor faults that if left would give an unsatisfactory report.
    The observation is listed in the EICR but no code given and the words “rectified during inspection” added.
     
  12. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    I didn't say that, however an EICR will still tell you weather a new consumer unit has been fitted correctly or not, even if you did the job yourself.
     
  13. MGW

    MGW Well-Known Member

    The EICR is a professional opinion on the installation, so to cover ones self you would need professional indemnity insurance (although often included in public liability insurance) however the EIC report is a declaration that you have designed and installed as well as inspected and tested, so would be covered by PLI.

    So changing a distribution box, like for like, the person has not designed it, some one previous has designed it, so one should not be completing a EIC as it would be missing a signature for the design.

    However there is a minor works certificate which will allow for a signature to say you have fitted it, without signing to say you have designed it.

    If however circuits have been added, then it would need an EIC for the circuits added.
     
  14. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    Surely you have designed what MCB's and RCD's are needed to cover each circuit, if you remove a 30A re-wireable fuse and replace it with a 32A MCB then all sorts of parameters have changed and you would have to justify that design if things went wrong.
     

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