Clay gully drain, to keep or not to keep?

Discussion in 'Landscaping and Outdoors' started by MuirJ, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. MuirJ

    MuirJ New Member

    Hello all,

    We are intending to build a new path and patio at the back of our 1890ish Victorian Terrace. We've removed a fairly naf old concrete path (no sub-base, no support) we are now excavating and setting out the levels for our new path and patio surface.

    The path runs down from the back door and past the kitchen window, where the kitchen waste (incl. washing machine) falls out into a clay gully drain. This gully drain also takes rainwater from some plastic guttering from the roof.

    We've figured out the new levels and the old clay gulley drain is 180mm below the new surface. I don't think I have enough skills to make some kind of concrete surround/funnel without ruining the look of the new path. To make things more complicated, it is a dual square and round gully.

    I think my options are:

    Option 1:
    Fit a raising piece to the gully. I've seen Knowles make something like this: https://www.knowlesdrainage.co.uk/p...ces-buckets-and-hoppers/square-raising-piece/

    I've seen this linked in an older post which I think could work? But I can't seem to find anywhere that stocks this? The merchants linked on the website don't seem to have these on the website(s) and I'm not sure if this is even made anymore. I have no idea on on cost, and can't seem to find anyone on the internet who's used one of these pieces so not sure on it's effectiveness.

    Option 2:
    Cut out the current gully drain and replace with UPVC. From what I've seen a bottle gully seems to be the best (as it's roddable?) And I beleive I would just need to cut out the drain and trap part, fit a clay to plastic conversion sleeve and then connect up the new bottle gully.

    Basically the question is, does anyone have any advice on either option?

    Attached is a picture of my current situation, and what I've managed to excavate.

    MVIMG_20200622_164753.jpg
     

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