Confirmation for reasons to scribe internal corners on skirting

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by ShabbaPlanks, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hi again
    there now seems to be 2 ways to spell taurus, sill,and lintel, to name a few! there again you cant trust every thing you read on the net!!!
     
  2. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Actually, Google gives a spelling mistake if you search for'taurus skirting'.

    So what does that say ?

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     

    Attached Files:

  3. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    well it would if you wrote, for'taurus skirting!
    that says you cant spell!, anyways its not our english skills we are talking about!
    ps, have you seen what it says on your attachment?
    regards!
     
  4. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

    Two things, scribing is the right way to do internals, always has been and always will, much quicker to do, secondly it is as handy says spelt torus not taurus.
     
  5. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    I put taurus skirting and google makes an INTELLIGENT decision to say there is no such thing and gives results for torus skirting.

    Plain enough for me.

    How does that say I can't spell ?

    And what exactly do you refer to in the 'what it says on your attachment' ?

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  6. big all

    big all Screwfix Select

    we should realy step back from personal insults intentianly or not lol

    as a fact the contraction on a scribe is less than a mitre because wood contracts about 0.01 percent along its length or for practical amounts zero
    a mitre will shrink on both surfaces where as a scribe will only shrink on 1 face  the other componant will shrink but at right angles to the other face  so only half the shrinkage will effect the joint
     
  7. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Yes. And if you cut a mitre to fit, I bet you all your years wages that you can tap it in that 0.02mm needed to allow for any contraction, as I said.

    And I didn't see any personal insults!!!

    I think the most recent poster (jezbo or whatever) and I have been quite restrained by  previous standards. :)

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  8. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

    The simple fact is that is that scribing is simply the best method for doing internal mitres, there is never a situation where a scribe will not work for an internal corner and never a situation where the scribed section will not be able to be fitted to the existing section. It suits all skirting and admittedly is a harder skill to learn than mitreing but once learnt is the right way to do it. I cannot understand why anyone would want to mitre an internal, forget problems with scribing 225 skirtings, I recently did some 660mm skirting and scribed the lot no problem, mitreing would have been a nightmare.
     
  9. osdset

    osdset New Member

    I have to agree with goldenboy, scribing internals is the only way to do it, mitering internals would have been a sacking offence in my day, one of the posters mentioned that Victorians mitred internals on skirting, no they didn't what they did was a scribe with the moulded sections mitred, one halved over the other it looks like an internal mitre. I have removed loads of skirting from buildings going back to King George III and earlier, I have never seen one internal mitre.
     
  10. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    osdet you have reopend a real hornet nest of an issue here. 99 percent of people agree with you (inc me) and the 1 percent just wont have it! i even challenged him to provide a sample of his version of an internal to see which method was clearly better, never saw a thing!;)
     
  11. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    jeznotts wrote:

    well it would if you wrote, for'taurus skirting!
    that says you cant spell!, anyways its not our english skills we are talking about!
    ps, have you seen what it says on your attachment?
    regards!


    I put taurus skirting and google makes an INTELLIGENT decision to say there is no such thing and gives results for torus skirting.

    Plain enough for me.

    How does that say I can't spell ?

    And what exactly do you refer to in the 'what it says on your attachment' ?

    And where did I say that it was WRONG to scribe. I say my mitres are as good as scribes. I don't have mitres opening up, for the reasons I gave above.

    I don't see why you lot CAN'T understand that there is more than ONE way to achieve a good result.

    It's YOUR loss, not mine.

    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  12. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    If you needed to mitre a dado rail or cornicing you would most likely use an internal mitre So I can't see why anyone who has that skill can't use it when putting in some skirting.
     
  13. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    well i wondered how long it would take to hear from you again! you dont get a good result from mitering an internal corner no matter what you think and i know this because this is what i do for a living! i have seen it time after time and i have seen it done very well too, french joiners do it all the time but it is not as good!! and no you didn't mention ever it was wrong to scribe and i don't think i ever sugested you have either ! and really its your loss as i will never loose out when i scribe,any kind of moulding. nice to hear from you again by the way:) any other carpenter/joiners like to comment??
     
  14. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    whaaat?
     
  15. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Go on Dunc.

    Show him some of YOUR work.

    He might then listen, as he will know that an expert is talking.

    Jeznottt, you said "you don't get a good result from mitring".

    YOU might not.    I DO.


    Mr. HandyAndy - Really
     
  16. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    How do you scribe ordinary square edged timber for an internal corner?
     
  17. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    Well the answer is you don't because its not possible.

    scribing is fine for the basic skirting mouldings, and you need that mind set for contracting work, because that is what is specified.

    but you wouldn't use it for the more ornate skirtings. I spent a few hours measuring the skirting mouldings in a building near the Albert Hall. there was about 6 inches of pattern on the top section. A unique moulding. there's no way you could scribe it for an internal corner.
     
  18. osdset

    osdset New Member

    Why would you not scribe more ornate skirtings? The method I use is to mitre the skirting end first (after scribing the square end against existing skirting if it needs it)  which gives you a perfect profile to cut to with a coping saw, a slight undercut ensures a tight fit, this method works regardless of the width of board or how complicated the pattern is. If the board is too wide for a sliding chop saw or too impractical to mitre full width by hand I would just mitre the profiled section by hand. For those out there who may not have used this method, it sounds a lot more complicated than it is, it is much easier to show than explain!
     
  19. was dunc before

    was dunc before New Member

    fair enough if you can achieve it. but it sounds as if you need to do as much again to make scribing work. then consider how again an angled bay window where you have to use the scribing at an angle, which is effectively the same as cutting at an angle.

    and as you say why can't it be scribed?  you're right. and why can't it be mitred? I use both and can see the reasons, Its just that some of the arguments aren't logical.

    So in general scribing is useful for approx. right angled corners and with the more standard skirtings.( in terms of contracting production) but its principal of use is compromised in more demanding situations. whereas cutting is consistent throughout. You just need to get the angles right.

    and it still leaves the mystery of the scribed square edged skirting. can it be done? is the corner just simply butted? would anyone consider that a skill? not really. so for the sake of reputation etc i would naturally cut.
     
  20. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    you may think you get a good result  because you (bless you )don't know any better and there is nobody around to show you why its not very good and also your client doesn't know any better either.
     

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