Cupboard door frame - not square

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Janaka, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    I'm not sowing my toes off yet! Show me where your method is taught. Other wise; you say "tamatoes I say tomadoes": if it works for you I don't have a problem with that. Take care and good luck!
     
  2. dunc

    dunc New Member

    The mitre method won't be taught as an industry standard because its requires a higher skill to achieve. Its unsuitable for site work, as it cannot be easily quantified in terms of time and money, as it can only be expected of experienced chippies. Whereas a scribed joint can be reasonably predictedable in terms of time, money and production.
     
  3. Guest

    I don't have problems getting a good mitre joint. If you do, then that's your problem, not mine.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really


    What the **** - really means is


    My skirting was quite cheap it's the caulk that was expensive :^O

    [Edited by: admin5]
     
  4. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Good grief! I'll bet the "chattering" classes will be getting themselves in a snit at their dinner parties.
    "Are your's mitred or scribed?"
    "Oh mitred obviously, we insisted.".... Oh you poor thing have you only got scribed? Listen here's what to do, just put a pencil mark at 45% in the corner at it will just look like a mitre and no one will ever Know! Now what were you saying about David Cameron, I mean obviously he's no Margaret Tha........." (fades to black)!
     
  5. dunc

    dunc New Member

    As long as the corner is 90 degrees the basic process of scribing works fine. But what about acute or obtuse angles such as are found in bay windows?

    In order to make a scribed joint work, one has to include some mitreing also ?

    So its unavoidable, unless one only ever does the 90 degree joint.
     
  6. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Good grief! I'll bet the "chattering" classes will be
    getting themselves in a snit at their dinner
    parties.
    "Are your's mitred or scribed?"
    "Oh mitred obviously, we insisted.".... Oh you poor
    thing have you only got scribed? Listen here's what
    to do, just put a pencil mark at 45% in the corner at
    it will just look like a mitre
    and no one will ever
    Know! Now what were you saying about David Cameron, I
    mean obviously he's no Margaret Tha........." (fades
    to black)!




    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha bluddy ha!


    Best laugh I had all day. Well done.

    45° pencil mark to make a scribe look like a mitre.

    Ha ha ha ha ha!


    Checkov, you should know(well I'll tell you now for your future reference), that a scribed internal WILL look just like a mitred internal.

    The 45° 'joint' SHOULD look exactly the same scribed OR mitred.

    You WILL have the observation of a mitred joint.

    You WILL see a 45° line with a scribed joint.

    Of course, if you had any experience, you would already know this.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  7. Trog

    Trog New Member

    "You WILL see a 45° line with a scribed joint."
    Er! no you wont.



    By the way, when entering a room a scribe should always be away from you so if there is any shrinkage it's not so glaringly obvious to the eye. Also only one edge will shrink whereas a mitrejoint can open up any way it wants making the joint wider if both meeting points shrink.

    Regards
     
  8. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    "You WILL see a 45° line with a scribed
    joint
    ."
    Er! no you wont.






    Er, why not ?



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  9. limestone cowboy

    limestone cowboy New Member

    Handy, I'm not saying that you're wrong, but you're not right either. I have never ever seen an internal joint mitred instead of scribed for the very good reason, as dunc has said, that it's easier to scribe. If the angle of the corner isn't known exactly it doesn't matter, but for a mitred joint knowing the exact angle is critical. Scribing is the industry standard way of doing it. Why?
     
  10. Trog

    Trog New Member

    "Er, why not ?"

    Not at the top you wont because you don't cut it at 45o if you did it'd be a mitre .

    Dya know what Andy I can't be bothered any more with this chucking this suject back and forth it's getting damn tedious (again) agree to disagree.






















    I'm right and your wrong you stubborn F*er :)
     
  11. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Handy, I'm not saying that you're wrong, but you're
    not right either. I have never ever seen an internal
    joint mitred instead of scribed for the very good
    reason, as dunc has said, that it's easier to scribe.
    If the angle of the corner isn't known exactly it
    doesn't matter, but for a mitred joint knowing the
    exact angle is critical. Scribing is the industry
    standard way of doing it. Why?



    I'm not arguing lc. i'm not saying I'm right and everyone else is wrong.

    I'm saying there's no reason why a mitre joint cannot be as good as a scribed.

    See, when I fit skirtings(I've done a few but I don't do it for a living - which won't surprise anyone) I make sure that the first sits properly(square/upright etc) and it make a mitred joint there dead simple. Knock it in tight and that will take care of a tad shrinkage.

    You can take a square to the wall and know exactly what angle it is by eye. Could be 90° or 92 or 94. Cut the mitre accordingly, and it's no problem. Take a bit of time getting the first piece square straight and level and the second is sinch.

    So many time I see skirting that doesn't sit upright(eg. pushed in at the bottom) it makes me mad that someone hasn't taken time to sort that out. That would make mitring very hazardous.

    For gods sake, pack it behind, get it right, then carry on.

    A scribe that has to follow a 'pushed in at bottom' skirting works, but it is a ***** 'get-over'.

    Anyway, each to his own.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  12. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Troq is quite right (yet again)! A scribed joint is cut at 90 degrees not 45 and butted up so what you see from the top is effectively a butt joint. of course if it's done properly it could well be mistaken for a mitre. But hell, what would I know? I've only been cutting 'em for twenty five years!
     
  13. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    Andy,you can,t mitre a skirting and knock it in tight,the points of the mitre will dig into the plaster a bit and your second mitre will never fit.
     
  14. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Andy,you can,t mitre a skirting and knock it in
    tight,the points of the mitre will dig into the
    plaster a bit and your second mitre will never fit.



    No no. You don't knock the first one in tight. You knock the second one in tight.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  15. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Look, as I said before, I don't care if you use a chain saw or chew it with you teeth if you get the desired result who cares? However I hate to be pedantic (actually I don't, I love it) but Mr HandyPandy you are totally wrong about scribed joints having 45 degree angles. The whole point of scribing a skirting board joint is that it shouldn't "subscribe" (pun intended!)to the vagaries of walls out of square.
     
  16. dunc

    dunc New Member

    So anyone like to detail how a bay window is fitted with skirting? How well does scribing work up against mitreing?

    I know what I would use, mitreing. From the start, because I know I am going to have mitre somewhere along the way.
     
  17. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Look, as I said before, I don't care if you use a
    chain saw or chew it with you teeth if you get the
    desired result who cares? However I hate to be
    pedantic (actually I don't, I love it) but Mr
    HandyPandy you are totally wrong about scribed joints
    having 45 degree angles. The whole point of scribing
    a skirting board joint is that it shouldn't
    "subscribe" (pun intended!)to the vagaries of walls
    out of square.




    Checkov, you're another one that can't read then.

    I didn't say scribed have 45° angles. They don't.

    But if you look straight into a corner which has been scribed, it appears as though it has been mitred at 45°.

    Or it should do if you have cut it properly.

    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  18. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    here you go again mr handyandy ihave got to the point where Inow feel, that any advise give by you connected to the carpentry industry should be taken as advise not to be take dont forget that there are people that come on to this forum looking for advice on how to do a job prperly all my love and best wishes Splinter.
     
  19. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    MrHandyAndy: I don't wear glasses myself but I'm told "SpecSavers" are quite good or failing that, "Vision Express"! PS: you're not one of those "happy clappy God Botherers" are you? No amount of existential scientific evidence is good enough to convince them either.
     
  20. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Why is it when I say I cut a good internal mitre joint that doesn't show opening up, you have to say I can't ?

    I can, and I do.

    If you can't, it's YOUR problem, not mine.

    Live with it.

    I don't advise people to mitre.

    I don't advise people to scribe.

    I mitre(I have scribed, I prefer mitre, it's quicker for me). I make a good job of it.


    What is your problem ? You can't do it well. So ?

    Is that my fault ?


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice