Cupboard door frame - not square

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Janaka, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Who said you couldn't cut a perfect internal mitre? Not me or anyone else as far as I'm aware. If that is your preference then by all means do it. However that was not the point of the argument so don't try moving the goal posts!However you try to dress it up to suit your needs, a scribed joint is not a mitred joint. They might look the same to the untrained eye (indeed that is the whole point) but as "Troq" quite rightly points out there will never be a 45 degree angle visible on the top of a scribed joint for the simple reason that it will be a 90 degree one.
     
  2. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    Any way, this out of square cupboard door frame............
     
  3. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    Youre down fall is comfirmed in youre name mr handyandy,very similar to "that will do".I am just glad that you confine youreself to bodging in the building industryand never picked up a book on brain surgery or "rocket science
     
  4. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Btw, Dunc, you are quite right about bay windows. It's easier to mitre those internal joints. In fact trying to scribe them is a total nightmare!
     
  5. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    "any way this out of square cupboard door frame".....
    LOL chippie244....good point!
     
  6. dunc

    dunc New Member

    Btw, Dunc, you are quite right about bay windows. It's easier to mitre those internal joints. In fact trying to scribe them is a total nightmare!

    Well there you go. Enough said!
     
  7. limestone cowboy

    limestone cowboy New Member

    I have seen scribed joints done on a bay, but it didn't look an easy way to do it.

    Meanwhile, back at the out-of-square door frame... The great thing about the hinges recommended about 4 pages ago is that they don't need a square frame or a square door or a door that fits. However they can look wrong in a traditional style application because you see the edges of the door.
     
  8. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Who said you couldn't cut a perfect internal mitre?
    Not me or anyone else as far as I'm aware. If that is
    your preference then by all means do it. However that
    was not the point of the argument so don't try moving
    the goal posts!However you try to dress it up to suit
    your needs, a scribed joint is not a mitred joint.
    They might look the same to the untrained eye (indeed
    that is the whole point) but as "Troq" quite rightly
    points out there will never be a 45 degree angle
    visible on the top of a scribed joint for the simple
    reason that it will be a 90 degree one.





    You've never ever done this type of work at all, have you ?


    Take a normal bull-nose skirting and scribe it to the first piece, and the cut showing will start from the top corner, to the front corner then down the front centre.

    The top section (bull-nose) although cut at 90° will, when viewed from above look just like a 45° cut.


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  9. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    Try doing it with 8" taurus then get back to me.Sorry I thought we were talking about proper skirting not "Legoland" playtime stuff!
     
  10. Trog

    Trog New Member

    "You've never ever done this type of work at all, have you ?


    Take a normal bull-nose skirting and scribe it to the first piece, and the cut showing will start from the top corner, to the front corner then down the front centre.

    The top section (bull-nose) although cut at 90° will, when viewed from above look just like a 45° cut.
    "

    Ok Andy I concede that bullnose when viewed from the top will look like a mitre but and excuse me here but hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha bullnose *** hahahahhaha I'm talking about proper skirting like as Chekhov said 8" taurus or ogee or big ornate victorian skirting, and by the way the proper way to join square edge is to just mitre the top half inch and butt joint (scribe) the rest. I can't type any more 'cause I'm laughing so much at you being all self righteous about mitreing when clearly you have no idea.
     
  11. dunc

    dunc New Member

    I have seen scribed joints done on a bay, but it didn't look an easy way to do it.

    They may well have been scribed, but the cut has to be at an angle to but against the fixed section, therefore virtually a mitre.
     
  12. dunc

    dunc New Member

    Or in effect going to greater lengths to make scribing work, when perhaps mitreing would be simpler and more reliable in such a case. ie bay windows.
     
  13. Trog

    Trog New Member

    I mitre bays (not square ones though) because the mitre is controllable because you are working from the inside outwards and you can adjust the meeting edges to suit any discrepancies in the plaster work. I have scribed bays many moons ago when I was doing my apprenticeship but the time factor takes over. It's not easy and you have to undercut the scribe to 45o which is time consuming to get it perfect.
     
  14. Trog

    Trog New Member

    Oh and Andy fyi if you ever get the chance to work on any prestigious houses you will find that the skirtings were tongued and scribed. Scribed on the moulding and tongued on the flat section to sit into a groove of the adjacent skirting. So stick that in your bullnose cutting mitre saw :)
     
  15. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    "You've never ever done this type of work before have you?" Err.. I've been doing it for twenty five years! I'll challenge anyone to outwit my skills. So come on all comers, bring it on I say.Been there done that got the T shirt!
     
  16. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    "You've never ever done this type of work before have
    you?" Err.. I've been doing it for twenty five years!
    I'll challenge anyone to outwit my skills. So come on
    all comers, bring it on I say.Been there done that
    got the T shirt!

    Well how would you sort this out.

    Hi.

    I have a new house. Bathroom has a cupboard-type recess space which looks like it has never had a door on it. Thing is, the frame (of 2"x2") is irregular. Width of the opening at the top is 272mm. At the bottom it's 285mm. The side I need to hinge from is not vertical.

    I plan to make a surface mounting door (i.e. it will sit outside the frame).

    Are there any type of hinges I can use which will work in this situation or do I have to adjust or rebuild the frame in some way.

    Thanks for any help.

    ;)
     
  17. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    I can quite easily sort out your problem. The solution is dead simple: You give me £250.000 and I spend it according to my needs not yours. It's called "Capitalism
     
  18. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    reads like the wall that the recess is not plumb,as there would not such a varition in the width from top to bottom
     
  19. Trog

    Trog New Member

    Can you use these and if you don't want to re-build the frame then pack out the bottom or let in the top or a bit of both, which is what I'd probably do plus there is adjustment on these laterally anyway.
    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId=A333003&ts=25905

    I realise that they wont allow the door to cover the 2" frame but you could face fix a scribed (yes scribed Andy, because the wall is out of plumb) piece the same thickness as the door to smarten it up.

    Regards
     
  20. goldenboy

    goldenboy Super Member

    bays can be scribed no trouble. Mitring internals is the refuge of the incompetent
     

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