Cupboard door frame - not square

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Janaka, Jul 29, 2007.

  1. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    Come on Goldenboy, it's just got back on topic, don't spoil it.
     
  2. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    "You've never ever done this type of work before
    have
    you?" Err.. I've been doing it for twenty five
    years!
    I'll challenge anyone to outwit my skills. So come
    on
    all comers, bring it on I say.Been there done that
    got the T shirt!

    Well how would you sort this out.

    Hi.

    I have a new house. Bathroom has a cupboard-type
    recess space which looks like it has never had a door
    on it. Thing is, the frame (of 2"x2") is irregular.
    Width of the opening at the top is 272mm. At the
    bottom it's 285mm. The side I need to hinge from is
    not vertical.

    I plan to make a surface mounting door (i.e. it will
    sit outside the frame).

    Are there any type of hinges I can use which will
    work in this situation or do I have to adjust or
    rebuild the frame in some way.

    Thanks for any help.

    ;)



    So how would I sort this out ?

    Well, firstly, I would not accept the 'out of square frame' and I would straighten it.

    If that was deemed too difficult or not possible for some reason, second choice would be to shorten the width of the door(to the width of the smallest opening) and extend in the same manner as the door to fill 'the other side of the hinges'. In other words, add a bit to the frame front(similar to what the door is)the width needed to make the side square/plumb, and hinge the door from the now plumb frame edge cover.

    (not explained that too good, need clarification, just ask)


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  3. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    chippie244: To be serious rather than frivolent, why not just take the 2x2 frame out and throw it away. Then you can use your skills to build a new one, nice and square and plumb and then you won't have to rely on adjustable hinges!
     
  4. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    It's not my cupboard. It's got nothing to do with me. I'm just trying to get an answer for the OP that doesn't involve skirting.:)
     
  5. diybobessex

    diybobessex New Member

    Back to mitring ! Have you guys seen this ? http://www.magicmitre.co.uk/ Anyway, I'm an amateur diy guy, but bloody fussy about the way things fit. I’ve no preferred way of mitring skirting boards, but I know from experience that the bloody wall plastering is usually so out of square and on the ****, my nice accurate cut mitres never fit, and need adjusting. It’s all the plasterers fault.
     
  6. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    Back to mitring ! Have you guys seen this ?
    http://www.magicmitre.co.uk/ Anyway, I'm an amateur
    diy guy, but bloody fussy about the way things fit.
    I’ve no preferred way of mitring skirting boards, but
    I know from experience that the bloody wall
    plastering is usually so out of square and on the
    ****, my nice accurate cut mitres never fit, and need
    adjusting. It’s all the plasterers fault. YES
     
  7. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    I give in and I'll join in. I've got a bay window to skirt an the ***** spread has made it a curve rather than angles. Much kerfing ahead I fear.

    [Edited by: admin5]
     
  8. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    I give in and I'll join in. I've got a bay window to
    skirt an the b@stard spread has made it a curve
    rather than angles. Much kerfing ahead I fear.



    What profile is the skirting ?


    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  9. Chekhov

    Chekhov Member

    I noticed from the picture of that mitre contraption that it was being used to cut a cornice. I doubt you could fit an 8" skirting into it! Or anything larger for that matter.
     
  10. pburgum

    pburgum New Member

    |Internal mitre shows off shrinkage more!!!!!
     
  11. Trog

    Trog New Member

    ******.

    [Edited by: admin5]
     
  12. dunc

    dunc New Member

    Many of the chippies who scribe as per industry standards have to do so because that's how they are trained.

    However unlike those who run their own businesses and actually choose their materials, site chippies have to use what they are given. This may mean wet, or sub standard timber. So there is very likely to be the case where shrinkage etc. occurs. Which is why they are convinced that scribing can in some way reduce this factor.

    If the timber is going to shrink that much it will even show on the piece that has been fixed. Also there are 2 ends to a piece of timber. Somehow this end which is usually used for exterior mitreing, miraculously escapes shrinkage. How's that?

    If you select good quality timber which has been correctly stored, it won't shrink. I have internally mitred skirtings in my home and its stood for 10 years with no movement or shrinkage.

    Also with many contracts using mdf, there should never be an argument about shrinkage.

    So I just don't think there is a favourable argument either way. If it suits you to do either then do it.
     
  13. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    There are many practical reasons why scribing makes for a better job than mitres ,which has been exsplained before and also at great length on this forum and beleive it or not shrinkage is quite a long way down the list
     
  14. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    I give in and I'll join in. I've got a bay window
    to
    skirt an the b@stard spread has made it a curve
    rather than angles. Much kerfing ahead I fear.



    What profile is the skirting ?


    Mr. HandyAndy - really

    I can't remember. I priced the job up last year, probably a 6" ogee. I'm full on so I'll sub it out,
     
  15. scribes not mitres

    scribes not mitres New Member

    You might find it easier to kerf and fix a square section of skirting and hopefully the curve will be shallow enough to plant the moulded part of the skirting on top of the square section.
     
  16. dunc

    dunc New Member

    There are many practical reasons why scribing makes for a better job than mitres ,which has been exsplained before and also at great length on this forum and beleive it or not shrinkage is quite a long way down the list


    Yeah I know I've joined in those debates. I use both methods as and when its required or when I feel like I want to. On site I'd scribe, because that's what you're paid for.

    But really they way some people go on, it sounds as if mitreing is being hounded out of the trade, with unecessary prejudice.

    Is scribing there to emulate mitreing, or is mitreing there to emulate scribing?
     
  17. dunc

    dunc New Member

    I know its too much yet again, but.... I have come across many interanl mitres, particularly in Victorian properties. I don't know for sure, but judging by the way things appear to have been done; it seems that the skirting was laid out before the plastering. This is my reckoning, because in many buildings the old horse hair plaster comes down as far as the top of the skirting. Working from the skirting the plasterers had a ready made straight edge and simply levelled up and away from there.

    The chippies therefore could access the joint and tweak it a few sixteenths of an inch to get a decent mitre.

    Also, when one cuts a mitre there are two sides to it. It creates both external and internal mitres, does it not? If you do a good external mitre, its other side forms a good internal mitre. Right?

    So its just a case of getting your head around that basic principle, and applying it to the situation, and making mitreing work for you.
     
  18. jeznotts

    jeznotts Member

    hello
    i know that we have dicussed this before and i know that this is 4 years old at least but saying scribing is good if you are part skilled because it makes it easier is just such a fuc*ing stupid thing to say it makes me mad!:'( i have photos of scribed joints in 9 in 2 part oak skirting (as prommised) if you wanna post your efforts and lets see what looks best, oh what was it you called me.....? ah thats right you idiot.
     

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