Cutting worktops.

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by Adam Godsall, May 12, 2018.

  1. Adam Godsall

    Adam Godsall New Member

    Plunge saw or circular saw for cutting worktops. Ive always used a circular saw. Mines just blown after ten years. Do i invest the extra on a plunge saw.?
     
  2. CGN

    CGN Well-Known Member

    Yes.
     
    AlvyChippy likes this.
  3. Adam Godsall

    Adam Godsall New Member

    Whats the advantages? For the extra spending.
     
  4. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Well-Known Member

    Are you Trade or a diy’er (like me)

    ie, how many worktops are you gonna be cutting and now, are we talking laminate board
     
  5. fillyboy

    fillyboy Well-Known Member

    I saw someone using one about fifteen years ago and had never seen one before, Festool I think was the only available choice back then, I looked at the price and couldn't justify the expense. Ten years ago I took the plunge :rolleyes: and bought one (Festool) and can honestly say that from day 1, I wondered how I ever managed without one.
    Trimming doors, trimming end panels and plinths, sheet materials all with speed and accuracy.
    These days there are a lot more options which has brought the price down.
    Worth thinking about a dust extractor as well, decent blades are also important, Freud seems to be the number one choice on here.
    Go on, treat yourself, you deserve it.
     
  6. Adam Godsall

    Adam Godsall New Member

    Thanks for your reply am i right in thinking you can cut from above?
     
  7. fillyboy

    fillyboy Well-Known Member

    Yes, great for sink cut-outs in worktops too.
     
  8. Adam Godsall

    Adam Godsall New Member

    How does that work is it because of the track? Any recomendations. Its just a circular saw is way way cheaper. And you can always use a trusty kig saw for the sink and hob cut outs.
     
  9. Adam Godsall

    Adam Godsall New Member

    Im a carpenter and fit a fair few kitchens. Got three to fit in the next few weeks.
     
  10. metrokitchens

    metrokitchens Well-Known Member

    Go for it. I have the Makita one and also the Festool. For the money I prefer the Makita. Used constantly fitting kitchens. Also had some carpet fitted at home and made trimming the doors a pleasure ;-)
     
  11. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    One you have a track saw, as fillyboy said, you will wonder haw you have lived without one. I've got a Festool one along with a couple of Festool Midi Vacs. The extraction on the Festool saw just works and take it from me it's needed because the amount of chipboard dust it throws out is massive.
    Fitting kitchens every day mine gets used nearly every day, worktops, cut outs, end panels, flyovers, trimming flat panel doors the list is endless. Because of the plastic chip protector on the Festool, as long as the blade is sharp, the finish on both sides of a cut piece is good. A circular saw will never get that good a finish.
    Because of the variable speed as well, it's the go-to saw for cutting Acrylic on our fits.
     
  12. GoodwithWood

    GoodwithWood Active Member

    Then it's a no brainer. A plunge saw will pay for itself in 3 kitchens. I prefer the Festool for dust extraction and I think the adjustments are easier than on the Makita but it's a personal preference.

    Give it a month and you will be kicking yourself you didn't buy one years ago.
     
    CGN likes this.
  13. mr moose

    mr moose Active Member

    Also if its the expense you're worried about you could get a second hand one. My Festool was around five years old when I bought it, now its twelve and still going strong!
     
  14. Jimmycloutnail

    Jimmycloutnail Active Member

    If you want a high quality finish then a plunge saw with a new blade can match a router for end panels filler pieces and worktops, before I had one I was rough cutting pieces then using a router to finish cut, with the festool This is achievable in one so making you work more efficiently, I’m looking purchase the Mafell now as it’s on another level but once you have used a festool product you can quite easily become addicted
     
  15. mr moose

    mr moose Active Member

    Yes then you will have to start going to F. A meetings (Festool anonymous) :D
     

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