Dimmer switch w/extractor fan in bathroom

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by tigerparks, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. tigerparks

    tigerparks New Member

    I'm wanting to install a dimmer switch in my bathroom.
    Hi guys
    At the moment I have one gang switch which turns on the lights and extractor fan simultaniously.

    If I fit a dimmer, will I be able to turn down the lights without it effecting the fan?????

    Second question, I've noticed on the new dimmer fitting it has no earth connector. It's made from plastic. So what do I do with the earth wire?

    Does this get connected to a point in the box?
    Cheers!!
     
  2. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent New Member

    I'm wanting to install a dimmer switch in my
    bathroom.
    Hi guys
    At the moment I have one gang switch which turns on
    the lights and extractor fan simultaniously.

    If I fit a dimmer, will I be able to turn down the
    lights without it effecting the fan?????

    Second question, I've noticed on the new dimmer
    fitting it has no earth connector. It's made from
    plastic. So what do I do with the earth wire?

    Does this get connected to a point in the box?
    Cheers!!


    The incoming earth goes to the box (metal back box), regarding the dimmer option, you cannot fit a dimmer if the light switch controls the fan..
     
  3. markysparky

    markysparky New Member

    If you insist on having a dimmer switch you will have to wire the fan independant of the light with either another light switch or pullcord. If the fan has a timer then a neon pullcord would be suffice.
     
  4. tigerparks

    tigerparks New Member

    Thanks for that.

    Incidentally why is that?
    Does it have something to do with the flow of the current? If you reduce it, the fan wont start etc...?
     
  5. markysparky

    markysparky New Member

    Dimmer switches work by reducing the voltage to the lights to dim them. LV fans normally need no less than 220volts to be able to function.

    Dunno if an SELV fan might work though?
     
  6. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent New Member

    Thanks for that.

    Incidentally why is that?
    Does it have something to do with the flow of the
    current? If you reduce it, the fan wont start etc...?


    Yes it effects the current (reduces)..;-)
     
  7. tigerparks

    tigerparks New Member

    I don't know if it's low voltage of selv. Would it be a problem to fit it and see? Or would it cause problems?
     
  8. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Reckon if you supply the fan via a dimmer switch the decreasing voltage will increase amperage (proportional to the voltage decrease) with the ultimate consequence of burnt out synchronous windings.
     
  9. Dicky Heart

    Dicky Heart New Member

    Just done this at home, and with some help from this forum, it works a treat. I had a 2 gang dimmer, took one side out and replaced with a dummy, which just pushes on and off. Lights dim, fan doesn't. Fab.
     
  10. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent New Member

    Just done this at home, and with some help from this
    forum, it works a treat. I had a 2 gang dimmer, took
    one side out and replaced with a dummy, which just
    pushes on and off. Lights dim, fan doesn't. Fab.


    Nice..;-)
     
  11. stumpy987

    stumpy987 New Member

    Did this work today with a timed fan didn't even give it a thought before i did it,
    works great romantic baths apperantly
     
  12. sparkiedoo

    sparkiedoo New Member

    U NEED 2 FIT A GRID SWITCH DIMMER WITH A BYPASS ON IT ....BUT U MUST WIRE FROM THE FAN TO THE SWITCH FOR THE BYPASS TO WORK .....U WILL GET A 400W DIMMER FOR C E F
     

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