Disused Chimney Ventilation

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by DIYBS4, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. DIYBS4

    DIYBS4 New Member

    Hi

    We have a chimney in the bedroom which was bricked up in the 70s/80s.

    No vent was provided and the pot has been left uncapped, but there is no sign of damp anywhere.

    I have opened it up and am getting a plasterer to form a square alcove and then skim to re-seal the chimney.

    I have attached a 'before' and 'hopefully after' photo.

    I have two questions:

    1. Should i cap off the chimney and add a vent, bearing in mind it seems to have been fine for years, and I do't want to upset the status quo? What's the best sort of cap to provide? (There are some roofers working next door so hopefully I can get them to stick something up there).

    2. Is there a way that I can fit the vent inside the alcove at the top (so it's hidden, rather than on the front of the chimney breast)? What's the best sort of vent to use?

    Thanks in advance
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jitender

    Jitender Screwfix Select

    I don't know, think the before one looks better! too modern for me, sorry

    Another option would be to remove the plaster from the breast, clean up the brick work and repoint. The arch looks interesting. Can some frame work be build behind the arch to bard off and a vent installed, which will be hidden from view.

    For the chimney pot, cowls are available.
     
  3. BMC2000

    BMC2000 Active Member

    Put a bucket in your garden, it will fill with rainwater. An open chimney pot will gather the water just the same.

    Cap off with a clay ventilator cowl, or a cheaper C-Cap (I used these for mine, check amazon, cheaper and look decent when fitted).

    To dry the stack out you need through flow ventilation, a hit and miss vent on the soffit of the plaster would be good practice.
     
  4. KIAB

    KIAB Super Member

    AGREE.:)


    It's called character.:)


    I don't know, think the before one looks better! too modern for me, sorry
     

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