Does anyone else have problems with G4 lamps?

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Captain Birdseye, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Captain Birdseye

    Captain Birdseye New Member

    My in laws' kitchen has worktop lights with 12v 20w g4 lamps in them. They tend to get used a lot because there's not much natural light, but every time we visit (most weekends) I end up having to sort out one or two "failed" bulbs. The bulbs haven't usually blown, but they suffer from bad connections in the fitting. Usually, holding the lamp with a cloth and working it in the socket scrubs the connections clean and all is OK again for a couple of days. I suspect that the pins run so hot that they, or the contacts in the fitting, oxidise and break the connection.

    Does anyone know of a fix for this problem?
     
  2. > Does anyone know of a fix for this problem?



    it's steam from boiling a kettle/cooking etc that gets into the connections a causes the prob
     
  3. Captain Birdseye

    Captain Birdseye New Member

    Hmm, thanks T482. Strange, that. Whoever would have thought that a lamp designed to be fitted over a kitchen worktop might be subjected to a bit of steam?

    Question is: How do I get round the problem? For example, anyone tried dipping the pins in silicone sealant before fitting the bulb to keep the point of contact dry? Or will it burn/melt all over the capsule and cause an even bigger problem?
     
  4. Guest

    "How do I get round the problem?"

    change the fittings for ones that have a cover over the bulbs

    they are as cheap as chips
     
  5. Captain Birdseye

    Captain Birdseye New Member

    Thanks, FF. These actually do have covers, and that's part of the problem. It's such a pain to prise back the catches to release the glass and get at the lamp, my father in law can't do it himself, so I end up doing it.

    I know they're cheap, but that's not the point. I don't want to change them for a similar fitting which suffers from exactly the same problem. It seems to me the design of these halogen capsule lamps is flawed because the pins run so hot. I had a similar problem with an old desk lamp years ago and ended up scrapping that.
     
  6. Sparkie_Portsmouth

    Sparkie_Portsmouth New Member

    I think he only long term solution would be to replace them altogether for a different design. Silicone etc is ok but not for high temp however electrical compound as used for cartridge heaters etc may give some protection. Guess it boils down to how much you love the inlaws. If it were mine i would remove the fittings and leave the live wires hanging!!!
     
  7. Removed 4

    Removed 4 New Member

    It seems to
    me the design of these halogen capsule lamps is
    flawed because the pins run so hot.

    Indeed so. They are truly the work of Satan.

    I had a similar problem with an old desk lamp years
    ago and ended up scrapping that.

    There's not much point being older if you're not much wiser:
    The pin grips have lost their tension due to heat damage. The vibration from loading shelves and shutting cabinet doors just aggravates the situation. No amount of fiddling about will restore the lost tension.

    Ditch the beastly things and fit some ultra-slim, long-life fluorescents, such as "Link & Light". The 16 Watt size gives excellent 'white' illumination, has 'instant start' and won't give you sunburn....

    Marj.
     
  8. DandMElectrical

    DandMElectrical New Member

    G4 lamps, cheap ****.
     
  9. X

    X New Member

  10. Captain Birdseye

    Captain Birdseye New Member

    Many thanks for the advice everyone, and thanks for the link, X.

    Think I'll try the silicone grease first as nothing to lose if it melts all over the lamp. If that's no good, 'link and lights' it is!
     
  11. X

    X New Member

    if it melts all over the lamp.

    it wont melt
     
  12. Removed 4

    Removed 4 New Member

    Silicon grease will be worse than useless. It will vapourise at less than half the running temperature of a capsule lamp.

    The pin grips have lost their tension due to heat
    damage.

    > No amount of fiddling about will restore the lost
    tension.

    You're flogging a dead horse.

    Marj.
     
  13. X

    X New Member

    You're flogging a dead horse.

    Some peeps do that for a living
     
  14. Removed 4

    Removed 4 New Member

    They shoot horses, don't they?

    x
     
  15. 2 wheeled ant

    2 wheeled ant New Member

    Nope but me fishfingers always get soggy
    Can you help?


    Ant
     
  16. X

    X New Member

    Can you help?

    Stick them up the dead horses ****.. should be nice and dry there

    [Edited by: admin2]
     
  17. Clark Kent

    Clark Kent New Member

    G4 lamps, cheap ****.



    My, Scott you are boring...


    (everything seems a negative with you)

    ;)
     
  18. Lokkars Daisy

    Lokkars Daisy New Member

    It seems to
    [/i]me the design of these halogen capsule lamps is
    flawed because the pins run so hot.


    Indeed so. They are truly the work of Satan.

    I had a similar problem with an old desk lamp
    years
    ago and ended up scrapping that.

    There's not much point being older if you're not much
    wiser:
    The pin grips have lost their tension due to heat
    damage. The vibration from loading shelves and
    shutting cabinet doors just aggravates the situation.
    No amount of fiddling about will restore the lost
    tension.

    Ditch the beastly things and fit some ultra-slim,
    long-life fluorescents, such as "Link & Light". The
    16 Watt size gives excellent 'white' illumination,
    has 'instant start' and won't give you sunburn....

    Marj.


    CONCUR
     

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