Door hinge position

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by bungalow boy, Mar 17, 2006.

  1. bungalow boy

    bungalow boy New Member

    What is the reason for top hinge 7" down and bottom hinge 9" up ? I've wondered for years.
     
  2. mr e

    mr e New Member

    Try this bungalow boy

    You pose an interesting question and one might believe that the hinge is placed higher to allow for extra trimming of the bottom of the door, but the truth is somewhat hard to believe. When we look at a bottom hinge, we look at it standing back and in a downward angle and not straight on. This downward viewing angle gives the effect that the hinge is closer to the floor than it really is. This optical illusion appears to balance the bottom hinge with the top hinge. If the hinge were located closer to the floor, it would look out of balance and would stick out like a sore thumb.

    Beyond the issue of appearance, however, there are some practical reasons behind this hinge placement. A higher hinge strengthens the door and helps it to work more smoothly because it takes some stress off the top hinge. It helps to eliminate any potential bowing on a 2-hinge door. Finally, the hinge balances itself with both a kickplate (if you should use one) and the door handle.

    I couldn't of said it better myself.;-)
     
  3. OLD

    OLD New Member

    I think its because the bottom of the door could be cut to accomodate the flooring but the top will stay the same.
     
  4. -chippy_john

    -chippy_john New Member

    I can add another couple of suggestions, only suggestions mind, I doubt if there is a definitive answer.

    First of all 7" & 9" are not universally used, it's more often 6" & 9", but I've known some who use 6" & 10" or sometimes if you're using a jig it could be 8"& 8" (and then it's reversible).

    Most likely reason I can see is that the bottom rail of a traditionally made door is wider than the top rail and moving the hinge up takes it out of the tenon zone, 6" is enough to achieve this at the top of the door but not at the bottom.

    Another possible but less likely reason is the length of a chisel, you can't get an upwards push into the top of the bottom hinge recess if it's too low.
     
  5. Binfield Carpenter

    Binfield Carpenter New Member

    I think that it is primarily aesthetic. On a typical four or 6 panel door the bottom rail is about 2" deeper than the top rail. The hinges should not be cut into the joint of the rail and stile and having them about 7" (i.e. top rail plus 2") down and 9" (bottom rail plus 2") up gives the door a certain visual balance.


    Graham
     
  6. mj

    mj Guest

    9" up & 4" down probably a mixture of aesthetics & missing the end grain on the tenons of the top & bottom rails traditionally, ex 4" & 7" stock.
     
  7. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    I was taught 7" and 9". As said before it is so you miss the tennons in the top and bottom rails on traditional doors where they come right through the stiles
     
  8. splinter2

    splinter2 New Member

    Iwas taught6"and 9" for the same reason as yorkshireboy,plus middle hinge 2"s above middle rail
     
  9. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    It's to do with the optimum weight bearing on a door and it's hinges.

    6" down from the top and 9" up from the bottom is where the weight distribution of the door is best applied.

    But as said before, it is also to be in a position guaranteed to miss being fitted into the ends where the top and bottom stiles may be tenoned or dowelled, which would make a weaker fixing.



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  10. Mof

    Mof Guest

    Yes all very good answers which I also agree with,there is one other point as well, especialy as you get older!!
    you dont have to stuggle on your knees with the lower hinge a bit higher up.
     
  11. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Yeah! But you struggle more with the top one,
    because you get shorter as you get older!!! :)



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  12. lojo

    lojo New Member

    I was taught 6" down to the top of the top & 9" up to the bottom of the bottom. I dont know the maths but I was taught apart from it looking good set at that, the bottom hinge would not do alot if it was any lower.

    Other stuff I remember about door hinges from my old teacher was "most to the post" and "screw slots in line
     
  13. chappers

    chappers Member

    whats "most to the post" haven't heard that one before.
     
  14. -chippy_john

    -chippy_john New Member

    whats "most to the post" haven't heard that one
    before.

    It's a matter of which leaf of the hinge you fix to the door and which one to the frame.

    I use the alliterative ditty *fixed leaf to the frame*
     
  15. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Ah, well. Is it 'most to the post'

    Or 'more to the door' ?

    Or 'pin to the frame'

    I'm never quite sure.

    Or 'wide to the side'

    And 'short to the porte'

    Or 'all to the wall'

    And door gets the short ?

    But I use a phrase I remember with ease,

    My little ones' swinging about in the breeze. :)



    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  16. chappers

    chappers Member

    Ah now it all becomes clear always just worked on the fact the fixed bit goes on the frame the loose bit on the door. You lot must be getting on a bit and losing the old grey matter if you need rhymes to remember that ;)
    Now Richard of york gave battle in vain....if only I could remember what its for....
     
  17. -chippy_john

    -chippy_john New Member

    You lot must be getting on a bit and losing
    the old grey matter if you need rhymes to remember
    that ;)


    Yep, it's all true, too much sawdust has permeated through the eardrums and now resides where my brain used to be.


    Now Richard of york gave battle in vain....if only I
    could remember what its for....

    Hmmm, not sure, could cover a whole spectrum of things. ;)
     
  18. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    You lot must be getting on a bit and losing
    the old grey matter if you need rhymes to remember
    that ;)


    Yep, it's all true, too much sawdust has permeated
    through the eardrums and now resides where my brain
    used to be.


    Now Richard of york gave battle in vain....if only
    I
    could remember what its for....

    Hmmm, not sure, could cover a whole spectrum of
    things. ;)



    Very Good :)


    Could be even wider than a whole spectrum......


    Making Vests Every Morning John Smith Uses Nine Pins.




    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  19. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds New Member

    so what does it mean?
     
  20. chappers

    chappers Member

    took me a while to get that one, planets in order from the sun
     

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