Dual fuel towel radiator

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by apsence7, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    Hi, I've recently purchased a duel fuel towel radiator which has been plumbed into my bathroom successfully. I now have to wire in the heating element:

    https://heating-style.co.uk/collect...ical-radiator-heating-element-with-thermostat

    My question is: I plan to run the wire from the element directly through the bathroom wall into the cupboard directly behind, feed it through the wall cavity and then have it pop out into the hallway where it will be wired into the ring main. I have chopped out a socket next to a double plug in the hallway so was planning on just wiring this directly from the double socket using the following:

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-13a-switched-fused-connection-unit-with-neon-brushed-chrome/74976

    The wire from the element isn't quite long enough so I will have to extend this wire but that join will likely be in the wall cavity. The property is less than 3 years old so the wiring is modern.

    Does anyone see any potential issues regarding this setup before I call out an electrician to actually wire the 13a fused switch into the ring main?
     
  2. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    What bathroom zone will the radiator be in?
    Is the heating element of a sufficient IP rating for the zone?

    Is the supply that you are planning to connect to RCD-protected?

    Some electrical work in bathrooms are notifiable. This means it needs to be gone by a registered electrician. I suggest you find one and have him/her answer your questions, do the work, certify and notify the whole thing.
     
  3. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    The heating element is 400w and is a good 1m away from any running water. Apart from the toilet bowl which it is still over 60cm away from.
     
  4. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    Ok, so outside zones then.

    RCD?
     
  5. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    As far as I remember I believe that there is an RCD switch. I will double check. How do you know if the particular circuit is RCD-protected?
     
  6. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    Press the test button on the RCD and see if the power goes off from that socket.

    Simples!
     
  7. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    Perfect I'll try later,
     
  8. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    It should be RCD protected, if the property is only 3 years old, but its best to check these things........
     
  9. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    It is in fact RCD protected. I have two RCD switches and the one marked “63A”controls the socket.

    With that established, would the setup originally described be suitable or would I need to install a spur instead of just joining on a new piece of wire in the cavity?
     
  10. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    To do it properly, fit a box with a flex outlet plate, close to the rad and connect the element to that. Then run cable from flex outlet plate to fused connection unit in the other room.
     
  11. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

  12. Bazza

    Bazza Well-Known Member

    Yes. That plate.
    Only one fuse needed in the FCU. 5A probably, depending on the element wattage.
     
    apsence7 likes this.
  13. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    400W so 5A.
     
    apsence7 likes this.
  14. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

  15. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    You can usually tell when an appliance switch is on
    If you want a little light, you can use a SFCU with neon or LED indicator.
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-13a-...-unit-with-neon-brushed-stainless-steel/35700
     
  16. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    That’s what I originally planned. I’m
    Just a little confused as to which will need the fuse. The spur in the cupboard or the switch in the hallway
     
  17. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    Do you want an FCU in the cupboard and a switch in the hallway?
    I would just put a SFCU (with or without neon) in the hallway.
    Feed cable through into the bathroom, and connect the cable to the lead from the towel rail, using a flex outlet plate, or flex connection plate.
    Don’t think LAP do them.
     
  18. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    Ah okay, I misunderstood the flex outlet plate part. This will have to go in the cupboard as it’s not that easy to install it in the bathroom because of a concrete pillar positioned where the plate would go. But I can mount this in the cupboard, wire the element through the wall into it and then run a cable from the connector plate into a fused FCU
     
  19. spinlondon

    spinlondon Well-Known Member

    Another option, would have been to spur directly off the double socket and site the SFCU in the cupboard instead of a flex outlet plate.
    However, if you’ve already chopped out a hole next to the double socket then do as you say.
     
  20. apsence7

    apsence7 New Member

    Unfortunately the wire comes in from the element into the bottom back corner of the cupboard as there’s a concrete pillar blocking it from coming in anywhere else. Not very convenient to switch on/off so extending the wire and routing it round the side of the cupboard under the bottom of the plasterboard sheet (hidden by the skirting board) and then through the wall into the hallway seemed the better way to do it
     

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