Electric back box

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Ben Allen, Feb 14, 2020 at 7:01 PM.

  1. Ben Allen

    Ben Allen New Member

    Can someone tell me what size screws and plugs to use to fasten electric back boxes to wall as not sure which are best preferably from screwfix thanks
     
  2. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    Inch & quarter number 8 screws and red plugs 5.5 mm masonry bit is my preference, depends on type of wall
     
  3. Ben Allen

    Ben Allen New Member

    Thank you very much
     
  4. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    Cowboy, I use inch and a half. All depends on what the walls like though, I've had to use 4 inch screws/mortar/nail guns/frame fixings, you name it and I've attached a box to the wall with it before now.
     
  5. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Jord86 likes this.
  6. Tony Goddard

    Tony Goddard Well-Known Member

  7. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Just how old are you? o_O That is a borderline era for carbon dating, almost as far back as a whittled wooden spike or hatchet wedges.
     
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  8. Tony Goddard

    Tony Goddard Well-Known Member

    Of course it's not right unless you use one of those hammer driven rawlplug chisel drill things and brown fibre rawlplugs or that asbestos paste stuff you squidged into the hole!
     
    Jord86 likes this.
  9. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Nothing wrong with brown fibre plugs, or a Yankee. Just how do you fix to a cob wall anyway? :)
     
  10. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Remember the first year joiners/carpenters cutting the wedges with an axe, after cutting out the holes with a plugging chisel, for the grounds for the plasterers to plaster to and for the chippies to fixing the skirtings to.
     
  11. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Cowboy job, with round heads the idea is you cannot catch/cut the cable with the sharp edge of an ordinary countersink screw.
     
  12. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    I was taught that myself in college fifteen years ago, they’d also hammer them into openings and fit door linings and window boards to them, although I thought it was pointless at the time as I’ve got older and hopefully a touch wiser I do think that it’s important to teach the old ways to try to shape a learner into an all rounder, rather than just stick to the last twenty years of gripfill and foam, though I do like both of those products.
     
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  13. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Not for the door linings and window and door frames, but I felt for the young apprentices having to do house upon house of grounds.
     
  14. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Saved themselves the cost of a gym membership though didn’t they? ;)
     
  15. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

  16. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Rewires and newbuilds always used them, could not see the point not using them. All you needed was the Electrical Clerk of Works to pull up on it, for a silly thing like the wrong screws and you would have to change them all. Not worth the hassle.
     
  17. peter palmer

    peter palmer Well-Known Member

    Why would a round head screw stop the cable getting damaged if it got trapped against it, the insulation of the cable is still the softest thing inside the box and it will split no matter what it gets trapped against, and you also have the two sharp edges on the round head screw where the slot is anyway. Another load of nonsense dreamed up by a jobsworth again.
     
  18. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    Ah memories!
     
  19. RolandK

    RolandK Active Member

    They'd probably pull you up to if you hadn't "clocked" the screws!!
     
  20. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    True, still get sharp burrs on round heads
     

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