extending floor cut off

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Suzan Aydin, Jun 8, 2021.

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  1. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Hey guys,

    so the muppet that did this house wrote in planning permission that there would be a minimum clearance on the stairs of 2m, turns out it’s only 1.57m so we are always dodging a bullet, how hard is it to move this back a bit to give a bigger clearance? What would be involved in this?

    thanks

    some pictures

    https://ibb.co/KrgJTNK

    https://ibb.co/8PKwkjz

    https://ibb.co/Q9NSrWg
     
  2. jonathanc

    jonathanc Screwfix Select

    When was the permission granted for the stairs? The reason is that you are not always dodging a bullet on planning
     
  3. stevie22

    stevie22 Screwfix Select

    Stair headroom is nowt to do with planning it's purely building regulations.

    It's not a new build is it? If it is I would want words with whoever signed off the regs.

    You have the option to move the stairs away from the low point which depends on the layout upstairs and down and might be really difficult or cut the corner away which is very common in many properties new and old. This is probably easier.

    If you start to alter it then strictly you will need to fully comply with the regs.

    I have seen this type of thing in a new build designed by a noted timber frame manufacturer, approved by private bc, measured up by stair manufacturer and the small matter of woefully lacking headroom not picked up on until they came to fit the stairs. Cue for go away and rejig stairs.
     
  4. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    About 5 years ago
     
  5. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Moving the staircase isn’t an option because of the landing clearance being quite tight.

    how would it work in terms of cutting the upstairs floor back a bit to increase clearance from the first step? As that’s the problem
     
  6. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    When you say cut the corner away, do you mean the ceiling bit?
     
  7. jonathanc

    jonathanc Screwfix Select

    Then forget it. 4 year limit on enforcement for planning. If building regs have signed off also forget it
     
  8. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Thanks :)
     
  9. stevie22

    stevie22 Screwfix Select

    Your handrail looks seriously low too if the headroom is as low as you say.

    This is appalling lack of care by whoever has signed off on this: one wonders what else has been missed. I would take a bet that NHBC did it?

    Cutting back the floor is just as it says on the tin. You will need to restructure the floor to suit but many many properties have a cupboard in one bedroom with a high floor.

    I would worry about re-sale 'cos I wouldn't buy a property with that low of a clearance.
     
    Suzan Aydin likes this.
  10. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Yep, handrail is waaay too low, I think the previous previous owner (which is when it was done) was a “builder” and did it himself so…. Meh.

    I don’t think it’s load bearing above it as there’s just nothing above it but floor.

    do you think it’s a simple case as you said of just cutting back the floor or does it require a structural engineer?
     
  11. stevie22

    stevie22 Screwfix Select

    You need to find out how the floor is structured: there will usually be a trimmer under that wall. A good experienced chippy would be able to sort this you shouldn't need an SE.
     
    Suzan Aydin likes this.
  12. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Sweet :) I’ll speak to a chippy - btw what’s a trimmer? I googled it but got hair trimmers haha
     
  13. stevie22

    stevie22 Screwfix Select

    It's essentially a short cross beam to pick up joist or rafter ends where they can't run full length.

    For instance you cut a rafter to fit a Velux. You put a cross beam in above and below to support the cut ends. That's your trimmer. You'll usually find one round the stair opening.
     
    Suzan Aydin likes this.
  14. Suzan Aydin

    Suzan Aydin Member

    Ah ok I think I’ve used them before on the sides of a wall when joining the perpendicular joists to it.

    thanks :)
     

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