Extension roof pics- opinions

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by Stench, May 31, 2018.

  1. Stench

    Stench Member

    Builder has phoned me and offered to remove the ridge tiles and redo- I told him the dry ridge system would be my preference and will match next door and avoid any more issues with bad pointing work. Architect has been in contact and is planning a site visit early next week.
    The latest regs. say ridge tiles HAVE TO be mechanically fixed even if they are also mortared on. Builder has used three of these end tiles with a screw fixing (albeit screw hole has not been capped as should be) : https://www.roofingsuperstore.co.uk...okHy1NMF57pTrCbssbw_m944h8mX02BhoCGusQAvD_BwE

    But do the regs. mean each and every ridge tile has to be mechanically fixed? Or is the fixing in each of the 3 x end tiles sufficient when the others are just bedded on mortar?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
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  2. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member


    Every tile, which negates the point of bothering with sand and cement.
     
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  3. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    It was obviously not a proper Roofer who done that job,tell him that you do not want the same person re-doing it but an experienced
    Roofer with pride in his work.

    Properly laid ridge tiles look a lot better than the cheap and nasty looking dry ridge system and has been tried and tested for hundreds of years.
     
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  4. Stench

    Stench Member

    You're correct-the guys who did the new timber work for the roof WERE proper roofers and when they told me the builder himself was going to tile it I did hear faint alarm bells.Now I can see why. Not as if he's even saved much money on it as he's going to have to do the ridges again.
     
  5. stevie22

    stevie22 Active Member

    I agree with Dobbie: properly bedded ridge tiles look better and are better. A proper roofer would have refused to do this work in the rain.

    Whether you opt for dry or traditional I agree that all stained tiles should be replaced and also the valley: snots of mortar or scratches where they've been reemoved will trp debris.
     
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  6. Stench

    Stench Member

    Is there anything wrong with the use of that plastic valley trough? It seemed pretty flimsy and not very impact resistant to me.
     
  7. stevie22

    stevie22 Active Member

    Most folks use GRP: its so much cheaper than code 5 lead on marine ply which is the rolls-royce option and perfectly acceptable. What was on your drawings?
     
  8. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    One of the reasons I went with the dry system was it being much easier to install and also it provided the ventilation needed for the loft conversion.
     
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  9. Stench

    Stench Member

    No direct reference in the plans to the valley.
     
  10. dobbie

    dobbie Well-Known Member

    Would go for a Lead Valley every time,makes for a far better job.
     
  11. mrs erus

    mrs erus New Member

    I have absolutely no idea from build point of view but it looks very sloppy to me. Forgive me if Im wrong, but I thought ridge tiles were supposed to go over the edges of the tiles either side to prevent water ingress? that picture looks like they've been laid side by side?
     
  12. Stench

    Stench Member

    Update and a few pics.
    Builder has been back and spent two days stripping all the ridge tiles and re-laying them using dry ridge system. He took his time and I can see it's not perfect but it is a lot better than the first effort.

    Just been up to have a poke around and have noticed another issue that I'm not over the moon about- for about half the perimeter of the roof there is a gap of about 15 to 20 mm between the top of the outer wall and the underside of the timber he has attached to the top of the rafters where they overhang- see the third picture-rafter is seen on the left and timber on top of it, both are painted black. The gap is hard to see in the picture as it is greyish in colour but this is in fact the underside of the roofing felt seen through the gap.-
    I realise this gap shouldn't be there as it leaves access for wasps/birds/squirrels into the roof space. He could presumably have avoided this, or minimised the problem, if he'd used a wider piece of timber which extended further back along the rafters to close the gap more.
    What remedy can I expect him to suggest?. Don't fancy expanding foam...
    Again, thanks for your opinions.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/35561395@N06/27890253837/in/dateposted-public/
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/35561395@N06/40948418500/in/dateposted-public/
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/35561395@N06/27890256097/in/dateposted-public/
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  13. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    Few things I notice on pictures.

    Work look a lot more tidier now.

    On second picture the third ridge tiles is missing one of three of its retaining clips which secure the tile.

    Also the tiles on the last roe (ridge height) show nail hole, a few pictures in show that the nail fixing holes is 25mm from the top edge of tile. Maybe check tile spec to see head lap?

    Whether the got the setting out wrong and forgot to include this when working out the batten spacing's, i'e worked to the topmost ridge.
     
  14. Stench

    Stench Member

    Thanks for pointing out the missing clip- I will mention that tomorrow.

    Regarding the nail hole- I've just been up to have another check and yes it IS a nail hole and this is confirmed as there is another nail hole exposed further along the same row.
    Understand this means the top edge of the tiles on that row are possibly only JUST covered by the ridge tiles- what's my next move?
    tile.https://www.flickr.com/photos/35561395@N06/42711110782/in/dateposted-public/
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  15. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    May be worth checking the specifications for tiles. Nail holes don't seem a good idea. Think they may have overlooked this when working out the spacing's.
     
  16. Stench

    Stench Member

  17. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    Definitely not enough overlap.

    Don't think there is a quick fix, may have to strip roof :(
     
  18. Stench

    Stench Member

    I assume the only remedy would be laying out all the battens again to bring the top row closer to the ridge?
     
  19. Jitender

    Jitender Well-Known Member

    Think they messed up with the spacings, as its double ridge they may have taken the measurement from the top ridge and forgot about coverage of the lower ridge, as looks of on the higher ridge.

    Parents had a re-roof when I was younger, and only a few years ago when looking out the roof, I noticed one row had a smaller gap, builder messed up somewhere.

    Not going to look right if they just adjust one row, all need to be done evenly spaced.
     
  20. Stench

    Stench Member

    Would just ask you to look at my second pic in the group of 3 I posted earlier tonight- it's hard to see butif you look at the first whole tile on that row after the cut tile- you can just make out a nail hole there, which appears a lot closer to the ridge tile - so maybe (finger crossed) the whole row is not affected in the same way- p'raps because the batten is not fitted perfectly straight or the nail holes are not all consistently the same distance from top edge of tile??
     

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