Fischer Future Heat

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by Philip Hyde, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Hi anybody fitted any Fischer Heaters. Looking for a replacement for some storage heaters. They seem like a good compromise.
     
  2. Hfs

    Hfs Active Member

    Have a look at haverland heaters
     
    Philip Hyde likes this.
  3. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Will do thanks
     
  4. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Been looking at Ronite ones but the Fischer ones seem to have a Clay Storage liner on the heater
     
  5. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    May I ask why you are replacing storage heaters?
     
  6. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Getting old and feel Modern electric heaters will be more energy efficient than old storage heaters. Last Jan cost £100 in a 30 day period. That's 3 heaters 5 1/2 nights charge up each week. But on warmer days shop was to hot.
     
  7. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    Fair enough but do your research thoroughly , having a feel for something is not a replacement for the science, Fischer claim all sorts
     
  8. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Yeah will do. Was thinking of heat pump air con unit. But then energy use in the summer would rise considerably as the staff and customers would want it on cooling. :)
     
  9. Comlec

    Comlec Well-Known Member

    Electric heating is always 100% efficient - all electricity consumed is turned into heat. The problem with these heater is how the heat is stored and released.
     
  10. Tony Goddard

    Tony Goddard Active Member

    As Comlec says, a 1950's Belling 1Kw convection heater is every bit as efficient as a 2019 1Kw Rointe radiator - 1kw of energy converted to heat is 1kw, then and now - what can be varied is the way that heat is delivered and how long after switch on heat is given and how long after switch off heat stops. That 1950's convector with open spiral elements will heat almost as soon as it is switched on, and stop delivering heat very soon (seconds) after switch off. These modern ceramic heaters store a little heat in the ceramic blocks so they continue releasing heat for a time after switch off, but on the flip side they take longer to get going.
    The reason the oil filled radiator was developed in the 1930's was to be a clean convector, it doesn't burn dust at switch on and the mineral filled elements have a lot more life expectancy than open spirals.
    These new ceramic ones are a liquid free development of that, no beef with them, but some claims made about them by some companies are somewhere between daft and outright porky pies.
     
  11. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Thanks for the replies. I think modern thermostatic controls will be better and maybe the way it delivers the heat as in drawing the air over it.
     
  12. Tony Goddard

    Tony Goddard Active Member

    No doubt at all that the modern control gear and finned, sectional aluminium construction will be far superior in terms of convection currents than the tin boxes of yesteryear - all designed with computers and airflow simulations for maximum efficiency.
     
    Philip Hyde likes this.
  13. CraigMcK

    CraigMcK Well-Known Member

    But you can’t get away from the fact to heat a room to a certain temperature for a certain time will need basically the same kw output, so in essence cost exactly the same. Given a similar January I would expect it to cost the same £100 to do the job.
     
  14. Big K

    Big K New Member

    What would be different in using an make or style of alternative heating to NSH is the cost of the energy for heating.
    You can not run any alternative type of heater on the NSH dedicted circuits unless you only want heat overnight, or at the times your off peak is active.
    A reconfiguration of the restricted distribution board would be required so as the circuits were 24 hour
    Replacement isolating switches will also be required to be fused spurs as opposed to 20 Amp DP switches
     
  15. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Yes But the storage heaters charge overnight what ever the external temp. If you get a warm day the day heaters would not be running as much.
     
  16. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Yeah replacing to fuse Spurs is not a problem. I'm going to use a change over contactor so can get some heat into the heaters and building on the last couple of hours of night units then over on to the day when the night meter drops off
     
  17. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    Why would you replace the 20 amp DPs?
     
  18. Philip Hyde

    Philip Hyde Active Member

    Got 32A MCB on them cheaper to put Fuse spur on it than MCB
     
  19. Bogle Crag

    Bogle Crag Active Member

    Your storage heaters were/ are on a 32 amp MCB
     
  20. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Well-Known Member

    The makers of the system you suggest are sufficiently vague in their advertising to avoid breaking the rules. The basis truth is that all electric heaters are 100% efficient, as you are using storage heaters it is the method of storage and delivery control that is the issue. Larger heaters in bulk, not KW, will store more heat. I assume that at the end of the working day your staff are using fan heaters to supplement the diminishing output from the storage heaters. This will be a cost extra to your electric bill. You did suggest heat a pump, this would be best for you and cheaper to run, it would give heat throughout the working day.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2019

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