Fitted concealed shower

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by Durham4416, May 22, 2020 at 8:57 AM.

  1. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Good morning, I’m currently renovating my bathroom, I’ve fitted some spotlights and rerouted the pipes for a towel radiator.
    Yesterday’s job was completing first fix for concealed shower. It seems ok apart from the odd weeping joint which I’ve nipped up and now fine but my concern is any issues arising once it’s tiled up so trying to ensure I haven’t missed anything.
    Firstly does the pipe work look ok and secondly, is there anything else I can do for a belt and braces approach?
    The plan is to not board or for a few days until I’m confident they’re no leaks.
     
  2. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

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  3. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

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  4. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    Personally, I'd never fit a concealed shower as you won't know if it leaks until it's done a load of damage and then, how are you going to repair it?

    Ditto when it goes wrong, how will you repair it? Unless it's a decent branded make, you won't be able to get any parts.

    Plastic elbows everywhere - I'd remove them and solder all the joints you can.

    The rainfall shower appears to have a very small pipe feeding it (sorry if it hasn't, that's just how the photo looks). You've a large surface area there, and with a restricted flow of water, it
    won't have much flow from the head.

    Have a look in the valve and see how big the drillings that the water is going to flow through are. I've known them only have holes around 3mm diameter, in spite of having 22mm fittings. You can't compress water, so if it has got very small holes, you'll get high pressure but no flow, and it's a decent flow rate you want.

    Other than that, it looks okay (he says, having comprehensively rubbished pretty much everything the poor bloke's done!)

    Sorry, it's just not my idea of a good set-up. Others may have different thoughts.
     
    Heat and rogerk101 like this.
  5. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Thank you for the response, I’ve competed all work myself so if it ever needs fettling then I’ll have to remove tiles worse case scenario, another option is it backs on to our landing area so I could cut a hole and go through there.
    To be honest, I’d have done the lot in plastic if I could as they seem a lot more reliable, I appreciate plumbers will be used to copper but these push fit joints seem fantastic.
    Regarding the shower head, I couldn’t locate a 22mm to 1/2 inch wall plate. Would it make a difference if I could as it drops to 1/2” anyway (under 15mm) so don’t understand how it would make a difference?
    It’s an unvented system and water pressure is excellent.
    Thanks again for your response.
     
  6. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    If the rainfall head is on 15mm, that will be okay. I couldn't tell from the photos. But I'd still look at the size of the drillings in the valve. High pressure's not much use if there's little flow.
     
  7. rogerk101

    rogerk101 Screwfix Select

    I presume you've tested it all under pressure and that it's all OK.

    I, too, would never have used plastic couplings for plumbing that is going to be essentially inaccessible. You're going to hate yourself in 2 years time if something springs a leak and you won't know where it is.

    If you're not confident with soldering copper, why not try your hand at brass compression fittings? They're not as reliable as well soldered copper couplings but at least there are no perishable parts in them. Generally if they don't leak (or weep) after a few days then they're never likely to leak (or weep).

    Other than that, I'd board it all up and then retest it before tiling.
     
  8. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Sorry, what do you mean by drilling’s in the valve?
     
  9. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member


    Excellent thank you. Some of them are on compression fittings and I was wondering if it was the case that asking as they’re ok now, they should remain ok
     
  10. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Screwfix Select

    Apart from what's been mentioned above - not a pipe clip in sight - totally unsupported pipework - not good, especially with push fit fittings - add some / plenty :)
     
    Heat likes this.
  11. Joe the Plumber

    Joe the Plumber Screwfix Select

    If you can take the shower valve out again, have a look inside the holes where all the pipes enter the valve body. They may be 22mm fittings, but often the water has then to go through very small holes ('drillings') through the valve itself.

    As I mentioned, I've seen 22mm shower valve fittings where the water then has to go through a 3mm hole in the valve body. You'll never get much flow through that. This is particularly important on rainfall shower heads.

    Yours may be fine, but it's something I'd definitely check before you sort the cosmetic finishing as it will be somewhat disappointing if your shower doesn't perform as well as you'd hoped once it's tiled in.
     
  12. NoOhmToGoTo

    NoOhmToGoTo Active Member

    Hmmm, I wonder what his wiring's like?
     
  13. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Lots of helpful comments and then you come along, I have no issue being criticised and always willing to learn but comments like yours should at least be backed up with some reasoning. I’ve paid professionals to complete work for me on the past and rarely am I satisfied with the outcome, I’d prefer to learn and do it myself.
     
  14. NoOhmToGoTo

    NoOhmToGoTo Active Member

    Miaow!
    Actually I've been here a while, it's you that's just come along.
    You asked what was thought of your plumbing skills and that was me saying it's of the "if it works it must be all right" category.
     
  15. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Still nothing constructive then. I asked what improvements could be made and the majority of people weren’t arses. I assume you always pay a professional to carry our any work you aren’t qualified to do so?
     
  16. Heat

    Heat Screwfix Select

    The push fit fittings are not “fantastic”, - they are a poorer quality alternative to soldered fittings. But they are handy and usually more likely to hold water for a diy install I must admit.

    I would have machine bent most of that copper and soldered any few fittings if needed.
    The shower valve I would have used an exposed valve of a good brand. (Recessed shower valves don’t really save space and often cause bother to repair or replace them).
    Pipes should have been clipped, as DIYDave mentioned.
    Really if you are genuinely concerned about your plumbing, best to search for a really good plumber who can install copper professionally, but you will have to search to avoid the bluffers.
    All extremely easy work to an experienced top level plumber.
     
    rogerk101 and Joe the Plumber like this.
  17. Durham4416

    Durham4416 New Member

    Thanks for your response, I’ll clip the pipe and it’ll be left for a few days before I hardie backer over it. I’ve ran it hot and cold and no leaks. I’ve checked and double checked all fittings and applied ptfe in the the male end that screws in to the valve.
    It’s not really I was concerned but just wanted experienced views before I close it all up, so thank you to everyone that commented.
    Also it wasn’t really a space saving requirement, more just for aesthetics hence going for the concealed valve.
     
    Joe the Plumber likes this.

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