Footings for sleeper walls

Discussion in 'Builders' Talk' started by legepe, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Thanks a lot for all your help... ill replace the sleeper wall in the middle as well.. Cheers..!
     
  2. legepe

    legepe New Member

    One more question... :) I have done a couple of hours of googling but to no avail.. how can i know if the middle brick footing will support the weight if I span from the ends of the house to it with no supports in between? I want to build directly onto it using foundation blocks and obviously not dig it all out to make a new foundation...
     
  3. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Could be, could be not, without seeing it, difficult to say, but I would usually renew the footings,I even gone as far as over engineering & putting in two sleeper walls with some spans, like as below, makes for a solid floor.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    For relatively short term grief and aggravation (especially close to dreaded Christmas), you have your lifetime of peace of mind that you don't need to faff about with it again. If you're gonna make a mess, make a big mess and get it done once properly.
     
    KIAB likes this.
  5. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Thanks guys... Ill double check tomorrow if the middle footing was originally made for a load bearing wall, if so i would think it would be sufficient for the load of the floor, if not then I will do as you say.. and rip it out to start again...
     
  6. legepe

    legepe New Member

    ps: nice job on floor KIAB.. hope mine will eventually look something like it..! :)
     
  7. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Not my work, I would have wall plates..:oops::D

    Just showing the benefit of having two sleeper walls over a long span, no chance of any bounce/springing.:)
     
  8. legepe

    legepe New Member

    :cool: i notice that wall plates wernt used
     
    KIAB likes this.
  9. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    It's not usual to have wall plates unless your re doing it all with sleeper walls.If you had a standard floor with the ends in the main wall and a sleeper in the middle on a wall plate,the wall plate would shrink over time and while the ends in the wall won't.Also don't forget your dpc,make sure you don't end up with it under the wallplate,because you won't be able to fix it down.Make sure your wallplates are dead level,which is not easy if the timber is not perfectly straight.
     
  10. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Not that many years ago, it was still quite common to bed the wallplate, mortar,dpc,timber.
     
    legepe likes this.
  11. legepe

    legepe New Member

    I was going to put the dpc between the top of the sleeper wall and the wall plate... is this not correct?
     
  12. legepe

    legepe New Member

    I had another measure up today and I would have to span roughly 40cm more than what is recommended (3.27m for 50x147 joists at 400mm) so i dont think I have the option to not build another sleeper wall at least at one end of the room. at the other end it is shorter of around 2.8m so should be ok...
     
  13. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    sleeper wall, dpc, then wall plate.:)
     
    legepe likes this.
  14. Jord86

    Jord86 Well-Known Member

    Double up your joists in that instance. Or buy 75x147's.
     
    legepe likes this.
  15. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Thanks guys... Itll be alright in the end.. hopefully :)
     
  16. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Got another problem which is creating a dilemma and spanner in the works so to speak..!
    At one end of the house Ive dug out the footing 40 x 40cm but left a section of earth/clay in the middle to separate it as the left side was filling fairly quickly with water and i wanted to see if the right side would do the same, but the right side has stayed dry. The water was coming through the brickwork on the party wall.
    There is a mains water pipe that runs over the middle of the ground in the living room from the front of the house, then enters the kitchen (concrete floor) then T's off and supplies the next door neighbor's house.
    To satisfy myself that the water was not coming from the lead pipe under the kitchen Ive dug it all out and exposed all the pipe - everything is dry
    I got the neighbor to look at everything today but they are showing me that its not their problem and that they don't care.
    Ive explained to them that this could be and i would think with time could effect the foundation if not correctly dealt with now
    Im not even sure if i should continue to pour the footings with this problem present
    I really didnt want to have to go down the route of applications and regulations to do my work in the house but I'm thinking that because of this problem maybe it would be wise in the long run...
    Sorry for this long winded explanation but I could really do with some advice :) (hopefully the pics attached will help)
    Thanks
    legepe
     

    Attached Files:

  17. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Contact your water board, you might be eligble for free lead pipe mains replacement,worked on a few houses, where water board has split incoming mains & install seperate stop cocks for each property, because previously turning off water in one house also cut the supply to next door house.
     
  18. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Great, ill give them a call tomorrow.. thanks
     
  19. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Forgot to add, water board replaced the lead pipe up to the property with mdpe blue plastic pipe & new stop cocks & to stopcocks in houses.

    I pretty sure it's the lead pipe that's leaking on your neighbour's side, if ground water, then other footings would have filled with water.
     
  20. legepe

    legepe New Member

    Got it... but waterboard will only work up to boundary, no? That means Im still left with the problem, or not...
     

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