Freezer in shed

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by sparksmate, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. sparksmate

    sparksmate New Member

    A neighbour wants a freezer in his shed. I'm reluctant to put a socket on an RCD incase of nuisance tripping & if I put a none RCD socket in there it could be used for other purposes.
    Any reason for not wiring it to a fused spur??
     
  2. JP.

    JP. Screwfix Select

    Extraneous....ie..Outside In Shed = Away from the central core
     
  3. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    Any reason for thinking that it's reasonable to unplug a freezer to use the socket for something else?
     
  4. sparksmate

    sparksmate New Member

    Extraneous....ie..Outside In Shed = Away from the
    central core

    I feel there may have been drugs involved in this answer.
     
  5. starlight tiles

    starlight tiles New Member

    freezer in a shed.are the gypsies.
     
  6. Mr. Handyandy

    Mr. Handyandy Screwfix Select

    Any reason for not wiring it to a fused
    spur??[/QUOTE]Any reason for thinking that it's
    reasonable to unplug a freezer to use the socket for
    something else?




    Yes. If it is the most convenient socket, it is, or would be QUITE reasonable to unplug the freezer for say, an hour, to plug in a mower to cut the grass.



    A good freezer(well sealed type of good) will keep food frozen for 24 hours(unopened) with no power.




    Mr. HandyAndy - really
     
  7. fooman

    fooman New Member

    20amp 2.5 radial to it with a normal socket for the freezer and another next to it with build in rcd.

    Job Done :)
     
  8. hertssparky

    hertssparky New Member

    Shed outside the equipotential zone.
    RCD protection required.
     
  9. allycat

    allycat New Member

    you only need an RCD if it supplid from a socket that can be used for hand held equipment. If you use a fused spur there is no requirement for an RCD
     
  10. sinewave

    sinewave Screwfix Select

    you only need an RCD if it supplid from a socket that
    can be used for hand held equipment. If you use a
    fused spur there is no requirement for an RCD



    Utter Bollox that allycat, sorry! :(



    Any socket that is outside is 'likely to be used for handheld equipment' and thus should be RCD protected.


    Whether it's supplied from a FCU is irrelevant! ;)
     
  11. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    I'm
    reluctant to put a socket on an RCD incase of
    nuisance tripping & if I put a none RCD socket in
    there it could be used for other purposes.
    Any reason for not wiring it to a fused spur??

    Quite right. Stick the freezer on a fused spur. If you want to add a socket use an SRCD plate.

    UP
     
  12. unphased

    unphased Screwfix Select

    As foo said but mine is more crectly described (SRCD). ;)
     
  13. I hope he adequately protects it from Frost damage!
     
  14. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

     
  15. NorthernSparks

    NorthernSparks New Member

    Cut the plug off the freezer & wire it directly to a switched FCU . Outlet can't be used to supply portable equipment outside so no RCD required.

    N S
     
  16. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    Or use a plug/socket with a non-standard earth pin.

    Or provide an unused RCD socket nearby and as the design authority determine that it would be unreasonable to unplug the freezer to use its socket for something else.
     
  17. MOONSHINE

    MOONSHINE New Member

    fooman

    Posts: 3,045
    Registered: Mar 13, 2006
    Re: Freezer in shed
    Posted: Feb 1, 2007 8:39 PM Reply


    20amp 2.5 radial to it with a normal socket for the freezer and another next to it with build in rcd.

    Job Done

    This is the only way. Why would the guy want to unplug the freezer? When he can fit a double adapter.
     
  18. Jake45

    Jake45 New Member

    Or provide an unused RCD socket nearby and as the
    design authority determine that it would be
    unreasonable to unplug the freezer to use its socket
    for something else.

    The problem arises when, in the future, someone decides not to have the freezer in the shed and you are left with two sockets that can reasonably be expected to be used outdoors (one for the pond pump, one for the strimmer).

    You should decide the status of a socket outlet by it's location, not by what is currently plugged into it.

    Jake
     
  19. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    I disagree.

    If someone in the future makes changes to the environment for which you have designed, and in doing so creates a non-compliance, that cannot be your responsibility.

    You cannot second-guess, or guard against, what might happen in the future. If your design is compliant at the time then that is sufficient.
     
  20. Jake45

    Jake45 New Member

    I disagree.

    If someone in the future makes changes to the
    environment for which you have designed, and in doing
    so creates a non-compliance, that cannot be your
    responsibility.

    You cannot second-guess, or guard against, what might
    happen in the future. If your design is compliant
    at the time then that is sufficient.

    How can you design an environment that is dependant on what people (without electrical knowledge) may or may not plug into socket outlets???

    Your design is not compliant if it fails to protect people who innocently unplug an item.

    I think you may be 'batting a sticky wicket' with this one BAS:);)

    Jake
     

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