Garden Workshop - Timber frame

Discussion in 'Project Photos' started by Jordash, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    The floor area has come out at a touch under 28sqm.

    By the time we've fitted out the interior I think the total will be pretty close to 10k.
     
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  2. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    At this point it was time to dig the trench, something I wasn't looking forward to. In the end I managed to dig the trench, lay power & Cat 6 cable and then refill the trench in a day.
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    At this point I decided to use some of the leftover wood to make a step.

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    Once I'd treated it and varnished it I put it in front of the door. I had also sealed the door and windows, the building is properly water tight.
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    Here's a quick shot of the inside, whilst I was still sorting the insulation.
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  3. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    Once I had insulated the walls and roof fully (not an especially fun job), I installed polythene as a vapour barrier and to keep the wiring separated from the EPS insulation. This is important as there can be a nasty reaction where the chemicals in the EPS can leach the plastisizer out of the PVC of the cable sheathing causing the cable sheathing to break down.

    I had discussed this carefully with my electrician and he explained that they are fine as long as they aren't touching.

    IMG_20191207_154833-992x744.jpg
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    My vapour barrier is scrap polythene from work, hopefully it should work OK. I did tape the joints after these photos were taken.

    When it came to wiring I unfortunately had to put the cables just below the surface of the plasterboard, as there's no room in the cavity due to the insulation. This isn't ideal due to possibly hitting the cables with screws when attaching the plasterboard.

    When it comes to the plasterboard stage I will mark out a no-go zone on all boards to make sure that I don't put screws anywhere near the cables.

    I ran a circuit for exterior light, one for interior lights, a ring for power sockets and a ring for the heaters.
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    All of this has been checked by an electrician.

    I haven't got a photo of the wiring for the lights, but there are 20 evenly spaced down lights, split into 2 banks. 10 on the outer (next to the walls) and 10 on the inner. Each circuit will have a dimmer.

    Its worth noting that an electrician is coming in to do the rest of the work, they were happy to give me instructions on putting cables in the walls. They are happy for me to assist when it comes to fitting the lights and socket fronts when they are in to fit the CU and hook the armoured cable up to the house CU.

    I would always advocate using an electrician to do the electrical work, as you don't want to burn down all your hard work (and more importantly it's a legal requirement)!
     
  4. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    Once all of the cable is in the walls and ceiling it was time to fit the plasterboard.
    Thankfully my dad was available for a couple of days to help board the ceiling, at 2.4-2.5m it just slightly too much of a stretch. So it was a fairly tiring couple of days with stools and props.
    IMG_20200104_161709-992x744.jpg

    Now you can also see the downlight locations. I did buy a Senco screw gun on Facebook market place and that was well worth it to speed the job up and to ensure that I didn't overdrive the screws.

    The walls were a bit easier, but the opening were a bit of a faff. In the end I used 26 boards.
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    I did put in some wood in strategic locations to make it easier to mount the consumer unit and heaters.
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    Sorry these next two images are blurry, I'd just swept up and they was still a lot of dust in the air.
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    That's everything now up to date. The plasterer is due in tomorrow to skim the whole thing, then we'll get some paint in the walls and ceiling before getting the electrician in.
     
  5. wiggy

    wiggy Screwfix Select

    Just under £360 m2 that's good going.
     
  6. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    Thanks, you know what, I never even thought to calculate that!

    I have been pretty careful picking suppliers and finding as good a deal as possible when buying the materials. Also getting on the phone and seeing if a local supplier can be competitive with nationwide ones.
     
  7. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    I realise that I hadn't mentioned it on here, but during the build my wife and I had a bit of a change in circumstances and this buildings use is changing.

    We have been fostering 2 children that we are now going to adopt. Because of this we need to free up our spare room in the house for them.

    So rather than turning this new building into a workshop (which isn't going to get a lot use due to kids!) this is going to become the mancave/hobby room for my wife and I.

    Hence why it is being plastered, rather than ply or OSB lined. And the choice of LED down lights rather than LED panels.
     
  8. Jordash

    Jordash Member

  9. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    I've just realised that I never put a picture up of the finished interior before I started using it as an office. I can't believe the timing on this, I finished it just as the lockdown started!

    So here it is:

    IMG_20200309_185810.jpg IMG_20200318_123024.jpg
     
  10. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Wow what a lovely job.
    Well done

    Johnny M
     
  11. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Screwfix Select

    That's reet nice.
     
  12. Damodog

    Damodog New Member

    Nice job! Looks great. I'm planning my wall and roof build for a 24m2 garden cabin at the moment. Did you opt for a warm roof with insulation on the top? I couldn't see any pics of insulation in between the joists inside so presume this is the case. I'm considering a cold roof to give me more floor to ceiling height as I'm restricted to the 2.5 height to not need planning permission etc. but want to make sure adding down lights is defo doable for a sparky to do as the insulation will need cutting through as it will sit between the joists on the inside.
     
  13. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    Actually it is a cold roof, I just forgot to photograph it! I also had to be careful about the overall height I managed to be more than 2m away from all boundaries. I ended up with a height of 2.995m!

    In terms of construction I wish I'd been able to do a warm roof as it would've been so much easier, but I wanted the internal height more, so had to do it the hard way.

    As the roof beams were 225mm and the insulation was only 75mm thick it was no problem putting the insulation in the middle third of the beams to leave room for the downlights and cabling. My sparky was happy enough with the gap left.
     
  14. hi pal, just out of curiousity how deep are your pads and roughly what thicknes of concrete do the blocks sit on, building a smaller version myself on a very thin slab of concrete, hopefully it willl hold up!
     
  15. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    So the peers are not sat on concrete. The pads are something like 100mm of tamped mod1 followed by sand for levelling the blocks. I then cemented the blocks to the pads.

    The visible concrete came from bad mixes that I needed to dispose of! So I just chucked the concrete on top of the sand and hardcore after the blocks were in place.

    I'm not sure what the depth of the pads should be, but mine don't seem to have moved and I've been using the mancave as my office every day since March. And the peers were in place for a year before that.
     
  16. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Jordash
    I have just had a note. It seems from you.
    That I have not replied to many posts I have read.
    Well because I had no comments to make of any consequence.
    If I dont read them I can hardly consider an answer.

    So if I read an input MUST i reply to it?
    If so I was not aware of it.
    If so it rather take the shine off the Forum.
    Can you straighten me out on this please.

    Johnny M
     
  17. Jordash

    Jordash Member

    Johnny,

    I'm not sure what that's about. I can only assume that you subscribed to the thread when you replied, therefore you receive a notification everytime there is a reply.

    It's not a personal message from me, but rather an automated message from the forum itself.

    The only message that I have sent to you is this one!

    Anyway, thank you for your kind words earlier in this thread.
     
  18. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Ok,
    So when i get a comment life you sent me there.
    Do I reply to the email.
    I am totally confused now
    It must be an age thing.

    Johnny M
     
  19. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select


    You can choose to reply to anyone you want, or choose not to if you don't want, it's entirely up to you John. In the bottom right hand corner of the persons post there are two separate words, "like" and "reply", if you hit the reply button on the persons post, your next post is quoting them directly so they know you are conversing specifically with them.
     
  20. Thanks pal lovelywork
     
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