Gas pipes - What are the rules

Discussion in 'Engineers' Talk' started by Bridgewarden, Dec 8, 2003.

  1. racitup

    racitup New Member

    Well this thread is full of people protecting their own interests at the expense of the truth huh!?
    The regulations:
    3(1): "No person shall carry out any work in relation to a gas fitting or gas storage vessel unless he is competent to do so."
    There isn't any definition of 'competence', so that means it is judged by a court of law should there be an incident. But if you've done a washing up liquid test, and smelt for gas after switching it on you should be fine and dandy.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2451/regulation/3/made
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2451/regulation/5/made
    HSE guidance:
    52 For the purposes of GSIUR, ‘work’ includes do-it-yourself activities, work undertaken as a favour for friends and relatives, and work for which there is no expectation of reward or gain, eg voluntary activity for charities. This means that anyone carrying out such work must have the necessary competence, as required by regulation 3(1). However, membership of an HSE-approved class of persons (under regulation 3(3)) is required only by businesses carrying out gas-fitting work.
    83 Anyone who does work on a gas fitting or gas storage vessel must be competent to do so (whether or not they are required to be a member of an approved class of persons). Therefore, do-it-yourself gas engineers and those performing favours for friends and relatives all need to have the required competence. The level and range of competence should match the full extent of work done, but needs only to be sufficient for and relevant to that work.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2020
  2. racitup

    racitup New Member

    EDIT: HSE citation included
    Well this thread is full of people protecting their own interests at the expense of the truth huh!?
    The regulations:
    3(1): "No person shall carry out any work in relation to a gas fitting or gas storage vessel unless he is competent to do so."
    There isn't any definition of 'competence', so that means it is judged by a court of law should there be an incident. But if you've done a washing up liquid test, and smelt for gas after switching it on you should be fine and dandy.
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2451/regulation/3/made
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/2451/regulation/5/made

    HSE guidance:
    https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l56.htm
    52 For the purposes of GSIUR, ‘work’ includes do-it-yourself activities, work undertaken as a favour for friends and relatives, and work for which there is no expectation of reward or gain, eg voluntary activity for charities. This means that anyone carrying out such work must have the necessary competence, as required by regulation 3(1). However, membership of an HSE-approved class of persons (under regulation 3(3)) is required only by businesses carrying out gas-fitting work.
    83 Anyone who does work on a gas fitting or gas storage vessel must be competent to do so (whether or not they are required to be a member of an approved class of persons). Therefore, do-it-yourself gas engineers and those performing favours for friends and relatives all need to have the required competence. The level and range of competence should match the full extent of work done, but needs only to be sufficient for and relevant to that work.
     
    Banallsheds likes this.
  3. Mdebatti

    Mdebatti New Member

    Thanks racitup for a well referenced answer. I might say the only one over the 15 years this thread has been going.

    Obviously lots of people being protective of their bacon as you say...

    The issue is obviously having to fork out for training and registration. So having a diy'er doing the bulk of the job may seem a lot of (potential) bother for not much return.

    It was quite entertaining to read the patronising & entitled replies of the corgi guys who wouldn't certify diy installations.

    It's a bit like us diy'er saying you all trade people are driving around in land rover and not bothering to quote for a <£5k job.

    So I'm sure there are lots of horror stories with trades having to rectify DIY mistakes, but the same can be said about pros not following regs in all instances. Not to mention the cases where the DIY'er
    has done all the research and done a superior job to that of a tradesman just because it was his home and could afford to invest the time to do a proper job!

     
  4. Bob Rathbone

    Bob Rathbone Screwfix Select

    From a an electricians standpoint, when we test an installation, we test ALL of it unless omissions to the test are reported on the result sheet. Surely the same is true for gas testing, the tester will accept responsibility for all of the installation unless otherwise stated on the result sheet. I would suspect such omissions are not allowed or must be isolated for gas. Now, the test will include all pipework, new, old, steel, copper, flexibles and pipework that may have originally been used for other purposes such as water or air. If the tester is willing to accept the pipe run installed by someone else, even a non gas type registered person (as will be the case if the pipe was originally intended for water for instance), then it must be OK and within the rules to accept a new run that contains fresh air, provided that it complies with installation methods and does not leak. I see no issues. This is just a 'Jobswoth' issue. I now wait for the fallout.
     
  5. Riddor

    Riddor Member

    When Mrs Smith runs of gas she puts credit on the meter purges through the cooker so she must be corgi then
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice