Hanging internal doors!

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by WallWizard., Oct 27, 2016.

  1. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Heya guys from circa 2010!! Re all of the possible hassles involved in pricing for,and hanging internal doors particularly.. plus all door furniture!
    And for the benefit of anyone out there thinking of hiring one of us talented and extremely humble Craftsmen to do the job for them...Depending on the honesty and ability of the carpenter in question, and the inevitable variables involved, even with new door frames... Talking with the client and explaining the possible scenario in detail, taking into account the variables... Is paramount!!
    I've made a name for myself over the all too numerous years that I've been professional multi-trade (...and that definitely ain't " handyman!"), by walking customers through the job at hand,
    then explaining that prices are flexible, depending on what's involved. My own rate for hanging an internal door (...Fire check doors apart which are obviously going to cost more, labour-wise!), starts at £50/door,and that includes all door furniture. Any idiosyncrasies with the frame,or the newly purchased door,then of course the time involved increases, and thus also the labour cost involved.
    Hope you've all stayed with me during this somewhat overlong missive... And happy chippying y'all... Over and out,probably... Cheers!
     
    tore81 likes this.
  2. koolpc

    koolpc Screwfix Select

    £50 a door. Guess you have all the tools needed?
     
  3. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Hello....Yes indeedie! Hope so,after many moons! Oh,and even though it might possibly speed things up,and thus increase the profit margin... I don't use jigs! Merely rely on what those wonderful Japanese Craftsmen,undertaking the same job would use...Mallet,chisels, hand saw/s,et al....
     
  4. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Profit isn't everything, in this growingly myopic technological age within which we live.. Hey!
     
  5. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    But I assume you use a cordless drill for the lock/latch, as opposed to a brace and bit.....? No electric planer mate?
     
  6. koolpc

    koolpc Screwfix Select

    £50 a door gets you a real hammer and chisel too
     
  7. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    Internal £50, front or fire £200.
     
  8. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Hi...Yep...A brace and requisite bits I do use...and a try/block plane...And, Shark saws! Howsabout your good self?
     
  9. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    That's not to say of course, and you're dead right...a cordless and electric plane do come in handy,when the going gets rough and speedy! We'd be fools not to use technology when needs be....As the masters from Japan do!
     
  10. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    I'm afraid I'm a philistine mate, circular saw to cut the door to height, electric plane to fit but also Jack plane to fine tune, hammer and chisel for hinges but if I've got a houseful to do I'll set up my Palm router and do the recesses free hand, saves a minute or two, then cordless drill for the lock. No jigs.

    Price varies though doesn't it? Front door you're there till the jobs done, so unless you're lucky enough to hang the door in a new frame and fit all ironmongery, seals, letterbox etc in your workshop if you have one so the installation is simple, most definitely £200 at least all day long.

    I charge £40 upwards for a lightweight hollow core door as round by me people moan about paying that, as 'Dave from the club can do it for a tenner', £60 for an oak veneer door as most of the time you can only alter the frame not the door as the quarter inch lipping is pathetic so takes considerably longer, and upwards of £100 for fire doors. Stable doors merits a days pay, as hard work extraordinaire.

    Old houses merit higher prices, as sometimes youre lucky if you hang two a day, and don't get me started on doors in the loft room in three storey houses :mad:

    But them japs are clever though.......
     
  11. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

     
  12. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Ha!.... Welcome to the Thunderdome, my fellow craftsman! You've seen it all too...and there's nada wrong about being a philistine! Particularly your mention of stable doors tickled my funnybones.. as I seem to remember a case long time back,where a pretty huge cart horse in situ was involved!
    I wasn't at all too sure who was trying to out-psyche who,but I sure as hell wasn't going to rely on traditional methods to get my butt out of there as fast as I could! Yeah...the precision of Japanese craftsmanship is breathtaking, hey...
     
  13. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    One of the best tips I was ever given by a far superior being regarding stable doors was if they were to be painted, screw a batten to both leaves and hang the door as one. Proper eureka moment the day I took his advice......
     
    tore81 likes this.
  14. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Caramba..That's brilliant!!
     
  15. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Tell you what,though...Imagine trying to hang those wrought iron worked, gigantic oak medieval church doors..
     
  16. Jord86

    Jord86 Screwfix Select

    That's proper craftsmanship. Wonder what they charged, couple of groats? :rolleyes: It's very sad actually that most(not all) up and coming carpenters now use a hammer for basic shifting the item to be fixed as opposed to wielding it with a bit of skill, nailguns have replaced dexterity, if the door doesn't come prehung they're scratching their heads, and a chisel is a 'use once and destroy' item rather than learning how to sharpen and hone. And a hand plane is viewed as a foreign object from the abyss.
     
  17. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    Tremendously well said,my friend!!
    I don't know about your good self of course,but even tho' mostly self taught, I've served a brief apprenticeship or 2 going way back.. and the ol' timers (...now charging a fortune for their services, it has to be said,working for English Heritage and the like!),passed on such crucial knowledge of the simple things... like feeling the balance of an Estwing in your hand,before even contemplating its use! Or running your hand over a beech try plane,and feeling it's potential, and learning how to sharpen and set the blade properly... Or even learning how to sharpen a flute groover using several carefully shaped bits of arkansas stone...Ah me...!!
     
  18. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    And who ever uses a saw set and needle files to sharpen the teeth of their beloved Disston rip saw nowadays!? My dad,ever one for being very aware of the state of things,recently came up with a quote,bemoaning our too fast and throwaway culture... " Slow is the new Fast!" Not sure whether I entirely get that yet,but I'm working on it,lol!
     
  19. WallWizard.

    WallWizard. New Member

    I'm passing that quote out there,by the way...and those of us,Craftsmen& women, who intrinsically understand what it's saying,will understand...
     
  20. chippie244

    chippie244 Super Member

    Time is money if you are doing this for a living.
     
    wiggy likes this.

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