Hipped cut roof

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by chippy25, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. chippy25

    chippy25 New Member

    got a roof to cut on next week. Hipped both ends with box gutters where it meets the house and garage on the other end.
    The plates are 5.8m apart, with a plate fixed to the house wall and on the other end removing tiles on the existing garage and using the wall plate there.
    The pitch is 30 degrees and the rafters are 6x2 with 7x2 hips with a 4x2 raised tie 1/3 up the rafter.
    Main question is does this all sound ok?
    Rep from build merchants who has a lot of expierience seems to favour trusses but with the amount of cuts againts house wall and to form box gutters they are uneconomical.
    He's got me doubting myself!
     
  2. chip off the block

    chip off the block New Member

    sounds good to me. i love doing roofs like that because they take a little thought. I hate trusses and the only reason the local merchant love em so much is that they probly make more £ from em
     
  3. yorkshireboy

    yorkshireboy Member

    Hips too small in my opinion,how long are the hips? even for a short span you will need at least 9x2 to have enough depth to nail to.
     
  4. chip off the block

    chip off the block New Member

    hips only need to be 1" bigger than the rafter unless they need need to be depper because of the lengh and it is only a short span. Maybe go up to a 8x2 but 9x2 in a bit overkil
     
  5. chippy24

    chippy24 New Member

    Sorted
    Thanks for all the advice.
    The trusses came to £1250 +vat
    Loose timber came to £350 + vat
    Hence the rep being keen on trusses!
    Timber all delivered today and looking forward to starting monday.
    cheers again
     
  6. lojo

    lojo New Member

    I love cut and pitch roofing, best job of all that i do when the suns shining (not to much or i'll moan)

    Ideally the engineer should tell you which size components to use
     
  7. lojo

    lojo New Member

    been asked alot recently to fit 3" hips (8x3 etc)

    may be the engineers going a little overkill, but at least its thier call
     
  8. chip off the block

    chip off the block New Member

    work on a job and the chap built his own house and had to use 12x4 hips or steel. I think it is getting silly when things like that get speced on jobs when you go in a loft of a 100year old house with a roof with no sag and there is 2 pieces of floorboard for hips
     
  9. chippy24

    chippy24 New Member

    Tomorrow's the day it goes on! Looking forward to it! Been a couple of months since i did a decent roof.
    agree with chip about the over spec'ing, truss lot were talking about 3 ply girders out of 9x2!!

    Re roofed a 300 year old house 6 months ago and all the timber in the roof was no more than 3", all hedgerow stuff, worms had been through and all still in good shape!

    what's the country coming to!
     
  10. dual193

    dual193 New Member

    I love a good traditional roof job its an art form when its done and with the younger lads cutting their teeth on trusses its a dying art..
     
  11. chippy24

    chippy24 New Member

    All coming on well, Customer mentioned the words "craftsman" today gotta put £50 a day on now those words have been mentioned!!
     
  12. chip off the block

    chip off the block New Member

    i cant see how so many people struggle with trad roofing. Get wood, mark to lenght, cut birdsmouth, cut spike on end then nail in place. bit of simple maths and your done. And they are so much stronger than a truss roof
     
  13. chippy24

    chippy24 New Member

    really enjoy traditional roofing, only get probs when it comes to size of purlins, ceiling ties,binders etc. with the society we're in i don't like spec'ing things, Building control won't even do it. can't find any guidlines etc on it. All points to a "structural engineer" every time!
     
  14. leicsjoiner

    leicsjoiner New Member

    Breaks my heart to see trusses everywhere, as has been mentioned roofing is a dying art and there are plenty of otherwise good joiners in their late 20s - early 30s who just can't cope with it simply because they've not had the experience. Only one thing trusses are good for - pricework.
     

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