How do you reckon the former Great Britain is now viewed by the world?

Discussion in 'Just Talk' started by Deleted member 33931, May 15, 2018.

  1. dwlondon

    dwlondon Active Member

    It was irksome in general. Every supposed topic became a showcase for the same entrenched mentality. Tedious.
     
  2. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    1) Britain never was, and thus cannot return to be, a country!! England is a country, Wales and Scotland are countries , but Britain is NOT!

    2) Surely we are, presently, ruled over by faceless unaccountable Lords in London - so you reckon our own faceless mob must automatically be better than the other ones?? Are you really a democrat?
     
  3. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    For sure, we are ruled over by Brussels , Lanc. Anyone who can’t see this has either been hiding under a rock for the last 50 yrs or is living in a forest and has yet to see a bloody tree. Point taken about the U.K. not being a country, but the EU do see the U.K. as a state of the EU. They do not see England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as separate countries. ( or at least don’t treat them as such) .
     
  4. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    I do think that the EU are now certainly looking at NI (and possibly Scotland) as some sort of "different" entities - but accepting it's up to the UK to sort out the 'difficulties', and that's going to be interesting. I still am not convinced Brexit will happen anyway, but let's wait and see!

    I don't subscribe to the idea that is put out about being "ruled" by the EU - if we were unhappy with anything the EU wanted us to do, over the years, that we didn't want to do, WHY did we never use our veto? You cannot have it both ways.
     
  5. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    That’s the thing though Lanc, the U.K. has voted against many EU laws/ directives, but they have still been passed by the EU parliament. Veto counts for nothing.
     
  6. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    Perhaps if you could give some specific examples of when a UK veto was ignored it would help me understand this business of being "ruled over".
    Perhaps you are confusing 'Voting against a motion' and 'Applying a Veto' on a decision?
    Some examples of the latter would be good.
     
  7. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Apparently ( on another forum) DA has told someone that he’s not banned, but decided to leave, (right after changing his username) I for one find this a bit strange. As far as I know only a moderator can change your username on this forum. Sooooooooooo, has he left of his own free will ? Or,, as I suspect, has he been shoved ? Hmmmm.
     
  8. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    If that's your reply to my question about 'examples of UK having to use a veto', then I presume you are still frantically Googling to find one:rolleyes: :rolleyes:. Or it's a swerve extraordinaire!
     
  9. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Did it look like a reply to your question Lanc? Did I quote you in that reply ?
     
  10. fillyboy

    fillyboy Screwfix Select

    Lanc, is what's happening in Italy as we speak not sufficient to persuade you that you're talking nonsense.
    The EU don't like Democracy, they've shown that with Ireland, Greece, the UK and now Italy.
    That's fine, it will be the cause of their downfall, and no amount of bleating by left wingers or the liberal elite will alter that.
     
    retiredsparks likes this.
  11. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    I do wonder if DA set up this Lanc account so he could chat with like minded people ( himself) on a forum. ;);)
     
    retiredsparks and DIY womble like this.
  12. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Super Member

    If someone from the Uk...does not know what has happened to Ireland, Greece, the UK and now Italy and the implications.
    They are..either
    1. liars
    2. living in a cave
    3. too stupid to be allowed to drive or vote or reproduce.
    4. LWLSM (left wing lib........)
    Please chose one or many numbers to suit.
    Rs
     
    fillyboy likes this.
  13. fillyboy

    fillyboy Screwfix Select

    Tell us more.
     
  14. fillyboy

    fillyboy Screwfix Select

    Good article in The Spectator. No link as you need to be registered.

    This week the EU revealed its true nature. Rather than hand power to a Eurosceptic, the Italian President Sergio Mattarella defied the democratic process, and the wishes of most Italians, and put a puppet in place. Once again a major European democracy has seen the results of a legitimate vote dismissed; swept aside because the EU can’t countenance dissent. It’s hard not to conclude that those who voted Leave in our own referendum so as to ‘take back control’ had a point. The governing elite in Europe simply can’t afford to relinquish control. They can’t let real people have a real say in who leads them because the grand EU project matters above all.

    In Italy, in March, the people went to the polls and were deemed to have returned the wrong verdict. Since then the main winners have been trying to put together a governing coalition. As they come from unfathomably different political directions this was always going to be a challenge. And yet last week Five Star and the League managed to agree on some framework priorities for a coalition government.

    All seemed to be going swimmingly by Italy’s political standards. The parties even agreed on an unknown academic called Giuseppe Conte (lets call him ‘Professor A’) becoming the new Prime Minister.

    Yet although Mattarella (who has the right to approve the government) seemed content with someone who has no experience of politics becoming Prime Minister, he drew the line at the coalition’s proposal for Italy’s new finance minister for the simple reason that he had not, in the past, shown enough support for the EU and the eurozone. Worse, 81-year-old professor Paolo Savona (let’s call him Professor B’) had expressed concerns about the whole project of monetary union, even floating the idea that at some stage Italy (where unemployment now blights the lives of a third of young people) might need to find a means of exiting the currency. President Mattarella could not permit such a heretic at the heart of government and refused to bless the appointment of the finance minister. So it was that Professor B brought down Professor A because of Professor B’s support for Plan B, sending both professors back to their classrooms and ending one of the more easily understood episodes in contemporary Italian politics. In the last few days there have been calls for Mattarella to be impeached — but he had no choice. The EU required compliance.

    By way of a coda President Mattarella made a last-ditch attempt to appoint somebody as Prime Minister who at least fulfilled the minimal criterion of being unelected. The President’s only problem was that his proposed Prime Minister — Carlo Cottarelli — is not unknown. ‘Mr Scissors’, as he is known in Italy, was also the candidate of the IMF and reviled for his loyalty to the EU and its advocacy of ‘austerity’ economics. Neither Five Star nor the League are willing to approve this appointment, and so at some point soon the Italian public must return to the polls in order to engage once again in the charade of voting in order to appoint a charade of a government.

    Of course, as so often, Brussels had its own clear views on this mess. Most especially on the ill-disciplined, unreformable Italian electorate. The EU Budget Commissioner Günther Oettinger swiftly gave an interview in which he said: ‘My concern and expectation is that the coming weeks will show that developments in Italy’s markets, bonds and economy will become so far-reaching that it might become a signal to voters after all to not vote for populists on the right and left.’ Many Italian voters, as well as fans of mafia bluster, might be familiar with this type of talk. ‘Awfully nice country you’ve got there. Shame if anything happened to it.’
     
  15. retiredsparks

    retiredsparks Super Member

    If you want to know how we are viewed...see the Tommy Robinson thread.
    RS
     
  16. joinerjohn1

    joinerjohn1 Screwfix Select

    Said it all there filly. ;);)
     
  17. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    Did you not understand I was simply trying to get you to answer the question I asked you about "When has the UK ever felt they were being "Ruled by the EU" enough to instigate a veto?

    You silence is deafening!!
     
  18. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    Surprised you put Ireland in your list - surely they seem very happy and prosperous in the EU.

    Italy is a different breed of politics, however!
     
  19. Heat

    Heat Screwfix Select

    They were, (the Irish Republic).
    They did well out of EU, but then went bust and the UK funded them. So the EU wasn’t a secure future for the Irish.
     
  20. Lanc

    Lanc Active Member

    Lost me there, Heat, Ireland are still in the EU, when, and by how much did the UK fund them? When did they go bust? Are they not an independent country?
     

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