Ideas on how to assemble wooden frame for shed shelving

Discussion in 'Carpenters' Talk' started by free_flyer, May 1, 2020.

  1. I've been following this story since it began because I am also about to build almost identical wood shelving for my new shed, I have had the shed for a month now and have tried plastic shelf that I had going spare, I have far to much gear so they wont last long, I then managed to get hold of two of those cheap metal knock together shelves, horrible things that wobble about and the supplied mdf shelves showed signs of rot so they are going back.

    I have been doodling designs for a few simple shelves but got a bit hung up on how it would look, well its gonna look like this because I am going to be cheeky and borrow his design, its simple and looks nice, I am lucky in that I have a few small wood yards local to me so ordering isn't a problem even if it means waiting for a week or so for delivery.

    Thanks for showing us the final result of your hard word, I for one really appreciate it :)
     
    free_flyer likes this.
  2. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Thanks Tuxornot

    Whenever I look at buying something I estimate the material costs and I'm always surprised what a huge mark up there is.

    The material for this first set of shelves cost around £60,

    To buy something of a similar size and strength would cost hundreds of pounds - I realise there are manufacturing and distribution costs but for mass production this significantly decreases. Not only is the mark up excessive, but for something as simple as shelving for a shed this is ludicrous money, its not as if its posh furniture !

    Happy to share drawings etc in pdf or original design files (Design Spark Mechanical, STEP files, 3D PDF etc)

    It was a massive help getting advice and tips from people on this forum, in particular DIYDave
     
  3. Your sizes are almost the same as what I need I I took the liberty of saving the images your posted. it was the image of the finished first unit that had me hooked, I like to see or imagine the finished design, that image did the trick !

    I never thought of using design spark for stuff like this, I usually use it for circuit and pcb design, dam it, I will be over this like a rash know I know it can do more than mechanical designs, poor Mrs Tux, forget the weekly shop, we have wood incoming ... lots of it :D

    As I stated, I had two of those metal knock together units, they don't have any bracing so wobble about and I really doubt they can hold the advertised weight, in fact the ones I am returning fall apart if lifted, the whole thing just rubbish, even the mdf shelves are naff, half of mine have green mould. I remember as will a lot of the guys on here, the older metal shelving systems, heavy duty stuff that could take a good beating, bolted together, that type seem hard to find, that type was the last of the really good metal bolt together shelving, by comparison, the newer stuff its just tin junk and I will be glad to see the back of it.

    I've been reading these forums for a long time, its a gold mine of information and advice and for the most its my daily fix for reading, I'm a retired electrician who has done a life's worth of diy but I seem to learn something new here everyday. The only thing that bugs me though is people ask for advice and get it then never get back so its rare we know how it ended, your quest is one of the very few that actually has been updated so everyone can follow from start to finish, so thank you for keeping us updated on is an interesting project.
    --
     
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  4. robgul

    robgul Active Member

    My timber is arriving on Monday - I've had the supplier rip the OSB sheets into 40cm wide strips on his panel saw to save me the job, and make it easier to move when it's delivered. I shall post pix when I've finished . . . . I have the luxury of retirement so shouldn't take long.

    Rob
     
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  5. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Hi,

    I am not sure if you live in the Newcastle area.
    But there is an excellent timber yard called.
    LAWSONS TIMBER.
    Its on the West road just opposite where the old
    General Hospital was.
    Great set of lads always helpful

    Johnny M
     
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  6. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    Well done on the CAT design.
    I am fine on PCBs with CAT.
    You don't get much out of RS for free lol.
    But worth a look

    Johnny M
     
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  7. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    [QUOTE="I never thought of using design spark for stuff like this, I usually use it for circuit and pcb design, dam it, I will be over this like a rash know I know it can do more than mechanical designs, poor Mrs Tux, forget the weekly shop, we have wood incoming ... lots of it :D
    --[/QUOTE]

    There are two separate software tools supplied by RS... Design Spark PCB for schematic/PCB design which is a strip down version of Easy PC by Number One Systems. And Design Spark Mechanical for 3D CAD which is a strip down version of Spaceclaim

    Being an electronics/software design engineer I've used lots of PCB design tools. Easy PC, Proteous ARES & ISIS, PADS, Design Spark PCB, Altium and now OrCAD.

    I had to teach myself how to use the 3D CAD tool Design Spark Mechanical, I had only used AutoCAD 2D in the late 90's. I did have a look at FreeCAD but never used it. As I use a Mac the popular tool seems to be Sketchup but this is far too expensive. I bought LiveHome 3D but this is quite basic and limited, I wouldnt have been able to design the things I've done in Design Spark Mechanical using LiveHome 3D.
     
  8. JOMEL

    JOMEL Active Member

    HI FREE
    I am a mear amateur at the CAT stuff no teacher just
    mistakes and learning by them.
    Ham Radio one lol,
    I have TRAXMAKER its old I suppose now.
    Its all I need. Just coming up 87 so new programs
    dont settle in as quick as they did.
    But that CAT prog he was using seem very good for the
    less than professional
    And free from RS... I must get it just out of principle

    Johnny M
     
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  9. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Moved shelves into shed

    Unfortunately I wont be able to hang the bike on the bike racks at the back of the shed as there isnt enough space

    IMG_9223.jpg IMG_9225.jpg IMG_9226.jpg
     
  10. [/QUOTE]

    Being an electronics/software design engineer I've used lots of PCB design tools. Easy PC, Proteous ARES & ISIS, PADS, Design Spark PCB, Altium and now OrCAD.

    I had to teach myself how to use the 3D CAD tool Design Spark Mechanical, I had only used AutoCAD 2D in the late 90's. I did have a look at FreeCAD but never used it. As I use a Mac the popular tool seems to be Sketchup but this is far too expensive. I bought LiveHome 3D but this is quite basic and limited, I wouldnt have been able to design the things I've done in Design Spark Mechanical using LiveHome 3D.[/QUOTE]
     
  11. Being a fanatic Linux user I had a few problems finding a decent pc based design software that would not take up the rest of my life to learn it, I used to use Altium but was never comfortable with it, it was a pig to use in a VM on Linux so when design spark came out it was a blessing. The only 3d modelling I do is for pcb boards, connections, mock ups, nothing really critical these days.

    Still trying to order my timber for my shelving, hopefully it will get done this week, I only need one rack but one thats robust. This is a new shed, just big enough for a workbench on one side and shelves on the other, leaving enough room in the middle. I was rather lucky with the work bench, I have a habit of hoarding junk, last year I came across a load of offcuts to timber that was fly tipped near to where I live so stashed it, I had enough to build a seven foot by two bench plus a drawer. There was enough left over to make a knee high saw horse that doubles as my drinking stool.

    The only problem was the big work vice I have, it would get in the way if plonked on the bench so I made a sort of steel clamp that slides the vice out of the way, its parked at one end until I need it, again made from junk I had hoarded :D

    --
     
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  12. robgul

    robgul Active Member

    Bike storage - looks like you're hanging the bike(s) by the crossbar which takes a lot of wall space - hanging up by the front wheel is simple with a hook gadget (PlanetX sell them, so do Halfords and other suppliers) - I have 3 in my garage with bikes hanging alternately top to tail to save space on the width. (Pic is obviously sideways on!)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Not my garage - but you get the idea.

    Rob
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
    DIYDave. and free_flyer like this.
  13. candoabitofmoststuff

    candoabitofmoststuff Screwfix Select

    Looks like you've ended up with a nice job there, well done!

    Unless I've missed it in a previous post... what did the final cost end up as?

    Cando
     
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  14. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Thanks Rob, Ill have a look once I've built and fitted the second set of shelves.

    By the time I've added the second set of shelves (on the right hand side) there will be very limited space.

    There will barely be enough room to get the two bikes I have in between the left and right shelving.


    upload_2020-5-17_10-54-52.png
     

    Attached Files:

  15. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Thanks Cando

    The wood cost £105 plus another £15 for delivery (I was hoping to collect the wood myself but B&Q have stopped their cutting service) so a total of £120

    Then another £10 for the coach bolts (50 off)

    This cost is for both sets of shelves, I've only built the one set so far and plan to build the second set next week.

    So to summarise the total cost has been £130 (say £65 per shelf although the first set has 3 shelves whereas the second set will only have 2 shelves)
     
  16. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    All done !

    IMG_9239.jpg IMG_9240.jpg IMG_9241.jpg IMG_9242.jpg
     
  17. DIYDave.

    DIYDave. Screwfix Select

    Nice update mate and good looking shelving system - pleased you got there in the end

    For the money, you’ve got the exact size shelving you want and importantly can fit into the shed, it’s fairly easily changeable should you decide in the future, ie, adjusting shelf height or adding another one, and I bet, it’s bomb proof !

    None of the above points would you get with ready made shelves so, it’s a win, win, win,,,,,,,, (etc) situation

    As for bikes, yes they take up a lot of room tell me about it !

    I’ve currently got 8 in my garage :eek:

    One each me and the wife
    Then 3 each my 2 boys ,,,,, but they’ve had more as well, and often, a friends bike or 2 that’s either left in my garage or my older son is a pretty nifty bike mechanic so he services them for a few mates

    I’ve got a large bike rack bolted to garage wall, holds 4 bikes on telescopic arms then another 4 underneath

    If stacked alternate ways round, they store neatly but I do loose my rag when the 8 become 10 :eek:

    Could you hang your bikes on the shelving racks with suitable hooks

    Slight pain when you need something off the shelf but guessing this isn’t on a daily basis
     
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  18. robgul

    robgul Active Member

    My shed shelves in similar style are finished.

    [​IMG]

    The side you can see has 4 levels (floor + 3 shelves), the other side of the shed (under the windows) has 3 levels (floor + 2 shelves) - or really floor, 1 shelf and bench top. Amazingly the 3 shelf side in the picture used 96 screws (that's with the 3 sets of legs and each shelf has 5 cross pieces for strength) The 11mm OSB was fixed to the shelf frames with a brad/nail gun. Units are 200cm x 40cm. Total cost of the timber + screws for both units was just over £70.

    The metal truck is a relic from a mobile tool unit I build about 35 years ago using some offcuts of Dexion bolted around two wire baskets from a bakery with the sides cut out and a wooden cake tray from the bakery for the top box.

    Dead simple to make - just now need to prune through all the stuff we have and load the bins that fit the shelves - the different spacing is to allow 3 bins from a well-known supermarket on each shelf (1 bay with 1, 1 bay with 2 bins - on each shelf and the floor)

    The end wall will have some hangers to store 2 of my bikes, the others are in the garage/workshop - and out of site there are wall hooks and racks for all the gardening tools etc.

    Rob
     
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  19. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Thanks DIYDave, I wish I had taken a picture of the shed before installing the shelves.

    It was a complete mess as everything was just thrown on top of each other

    As for the bikes, I did only have an old bike that was given to me but now my daughter has been given a bike so I have two to store

    For now Ill just leave them in the middle (in between the shelves) and see how I get on and maybe revisit in the future

    Need another project to keep me busy during lockdown now.... ideally I would like to start jumping again especially as the weather is perfect. Sods law says it will **** it down when lockdown is eased !
     
  20. free_flyer

    free_flyer Member

    Looks good Rob, we should go into business and undercut these suppliers who are selling inferior shelves for rip off prices !

    I'm surprised you had to use so many screws though (96 !!!!)

    For the 3 shelf assembly I used 43 screws:
    • TurboCoach Coach Screws Yellow Zinc-Plated 8 x 120mm (52740)
      • 18 off (shown in red)
    upload_2020-5-21_11-31-43.png

    • Goldscrew PZ Double-Countersunk Multipurpose Screws 5 x 40mm (12698)
      • 21 off (shown in blue)
    upload_2020-5-21_11-26-38.png
    • Spax Wirox TX Self Countersunk Woodscrews 5 x 80mm (2969P)
      • 4 off (shown in purple)
    upload_2020-5-21_11-28-9.png
     

    Attached Files:

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