Installing a lighting pole(hole depth for concrete or other methods?)

Discussion in 'Landscaping and Outdoors' started by butstu, Nov 21, 2020 at 2:27 PM.

  1. butstu

    butstu New Member

    Hi,

    I want to install a pole-mounted flood light so my lad can continue football training in our back garden over winter.

    I've bought a 6m section of 60.3mm Galvanised Tube, which I may shorten slightly. The plan is to have somewhere between 3.5m and 4.5m above ground. I'm used to postcreting in fence posts, but I'm not sure if the same principles apply so would appreciate some advice:

    - what hole dimensions would you advise for leaving either 3.5m or 4.5m above ground?

    - assuming this is going to need a depth of more than a meter, any suggestions for the best way to dig this? will manual auger be up to the job?

    - should I be looking at something other than postcrete?

    - was galvanised tube the right option?

    All advice gratefully accepted.
     
  2. WillyEckerslike

    WillyEckerslike Screwfix Select

    I looked at doing something similar some time back and found that some local authorities require planning permission to mount a light on a pole so I didn't pursue it.

    I don't think you'll need to go as deep as a metre. I looked at garden flagpoles for an indication of depths and it was nowhere near that if I remember rightly.
     
  3. chillimonster

    chillimonster Active Member

    When asked to dig one metre down I'd use a Graff digging implement, and a
    Henry vac, bag removed but not the filter, both vac tubes, and a long piece of
    plumber's PEX tube to clear the inevitable blockages of the hose.
    At that sort of depth I'd dig cautiously as all kinds of pipe and cable could be
    down there. I'd use Postcrete. I've done the Henry routine on soil, chalk,
    flint and even moist clay. (Waterlogged clay will be too much even for Henry )
     
  4. butstu

    butstu New Member

    That's good advice thanks both (and I'll check into our local authority rules).
     

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