Is it possible to have too much inhibitor ?

Discussion in 'Plumbers' Talk' started by Bray Fentos, Dec 13, 2020.

  1. Bray Fentos

    Bray Fentos New Member

    Over the years where I’ve changed old rads for new,I think I’ve only topped back up with inhibitor maybe once,my dilemma is,if i add a bottle next time what if it is too much,is it better to have too much than too little?
     
  2. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

  3. Bray Fentos

    Bray Fentos New Member

    Very interesting,never knew there was such a thing.
    I have 16 radiators and I’m in the process of replacing one which had discoloured and looked old,obviously when emptying the water I’m losing inhibitor every time.
     
  4. toolz

    toolz Member

  5. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    Kingscurate likes this.
  6. toolz

    toolz Member

    Never because I only bought the house in the last few years. It's got tanks in the loft and a tank in an airing cupboard for hot water/heating. These pipes also feed power showers.
     
  7. ramseyman

    ramseyman Screwfix Select

    Years ago we were told to test the effectiveness of the inhibitor by drawing a little water off, dropping an iron nail in it and seeing if it rusted. That would not test the efficacy of other constituents other than rust prevention of course
     
  8. Tilt

    Tilt Active Member

    Partly depends on how much water you drained or if you just closed the valves and opened the radiator up.
    You don't have to add inhibitor though, but it can help your system and boiler last longer.
    It is not the same water that feeds the showers.


    If you haven't had it done for a good few years, it cannot hurt, but testing the water is best idea if you can.
     
  9. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    Look at the state of the water in the F&E tank in the loft for the central heating. If it contains lots of sludge or is dirty, drain the system down and flush through with clean water and redose fresh inhibitor as per the number of radiators you have.
     
  10. toolz

    toolz Member

    The power shower has 2 pipes from the loft, one hot and one cold. Are you saying that the radiator takes cold water from tank in loft then heats it up? Or takes cold water from the mains supply?

    I closed the valves from the pipes and then detached the radiator and drained the water that was in it. I am not sure if my system is "primatic" or not.
     
  11. Tilt

    Tilt Active Member

     
  12. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    Do you have a small F&E tank in the loft fed from the main cold water? If so, what is the state of the water from the F&E tank?
     
  13. Hans_25

    Hans_25 Screwfix Select

    I doubt its possible to have too much inhibitor by simply adding another bottle. If the system is rather old, you could take the opportunity flush it through, then top up with clean water and fresh inhibitor.
     
  14. Teki

    Teki Screwfix Select

    Yup, that's what I would suggest as per this post.
     
  15. toolz

    toolz Member

    Yes, I have an F&E tank. The last time I had a look at it was 2 years ago (it looked fine) so I'll need to climb into the loft and take another look. If it's gungy then I'll drain and re-fill with added inhibitor. Thanks!

    @Tilt I'm used to combi boiler systems, never had a tank system before. Seems very old fashioned to me! I do have a couple of DIY books, will see if there's anything in there about heating and hot water. The pressure from the shower is absolutely fine, not weak at all. Running the cold tap from the bath, however, is very slow. Clearly the cold water water is not fed from the mains like the sink is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2020

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