Jigsaw blades ??

Discussion in 'Kitchen Fitters' Talk' started by ajohn, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. ajohn

    ajohn Active Member

    I want to curve the end of a run of worktop and wonder about using a jigsaw first and then routing to finish it off.

    Any ideas about the best blade to use ideally actually in stock at screwfix? I'll cut it worktop face down.

    25mm stroke and 45mm worktop so need a working length of over 70mm and hopefully little or no melamine chipping.

    Another problem. Haven't bought any blades for years. What gives with T shank and Bayonet? Are they really different. Milwauki jigsaw and of course they don't say what the style of fitting is. It is T shaped going on the one blade that came with it.

    John
    -
     
    Scott Green likes this.
  2. KIAB

    KIAB Well-Known Member

    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  3. ajohn

    ajohn Active Member

    Thanks. I'll buy a pack and see what they do on some offcuts. I have seen comments around on removing waste with a jigsaw before routing. I suppose I could knock up a radius cutter for the router and work from the back so I can fasten a pivot. :eek: My Trend worktop bit has had it so need to go to screwfix anyway. Last joint side I cut with it and a little messed up as result. Best option if I can't correct by hand is to recut a bit off as it's the male side that's off. All it's done is 2 joints and 2 practice ones in 6mm mdf. Bottom 12mm or so of the cutter is burnt and seems to have held it off the jig in places despite pressure in the right direction from me.

    John
    -
     
  4. WillyEckerslike

    WillyEckerslike Well-Known Member

    You will have to use some sort of guide for the router as there's more chance of Nigel Farage becoming Prime Minister than you getting a perfect edge freehand.

    Either get a jig to use your guide bush, set up a template that you can run the edge of the router along or set up some sort of trammel as you suggest.

    Edit: By all means remove most of the waste with any old jigsaw and just tidy up with the router.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  5. ajohn

    ajohn Active Member

    I have a template and a 3/4 dia bit with top and bottom guide bearings. Trend craft bought cheap off ebay, has a 2" cutting length. ;) Freud worktop bits this time. Bit of a bargain 2 in a box for not that much more than the cost of a single also a pack of the jigsaw blades mentioned. o_O They are reverse cut types though. Trouble with thin things when they cut pushing rather than pulling is that they don't straighten if for some reason they bend, usually just gets worse. I bought a pack as well as didn't now what was in the Freud kit. As '#hit usually happens at the worst possible moment think I'll take them back and swap for T101B's and jigsaw from the back of the worktop. Same blade but with normal rather than reversed teeth. :D They are 20p cheaper too so big refund.

    I can only put a truncated rad on due to having to blend in with the rad on top of the worktops. Have strips of melamine to glue on but don't think they would bend enough to match the edge rad.

    John
    -
     
  6. Scott Green

    Scott Green Member

    Unless I'm reading it wrong, it's hard to get a decent looking finish putting a curve on a bullnosed worktop and then an edging strip. Could you not just take a 45 degree off the corner and edge that instead? Looks more correct in my opinion
     
    KIAB and kitfit1 like this.
  7. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    No, your not reading it wrong Scott. Curved ends on a postformed laminate top look absolutely horrendous and are something that i would never do for a customer. A different thing though if the worktops are PVC edged, that works fine and depending how good a fitter is at blending the front edge into the curve can easily look invisible. A post formed edge though will never look invisible, in fact it will stick out like a very sticky out thing :D
     
  8. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    Out of interest, in case anyone knows. Why have Bosch stopped doing 101D's ? Or in fact are the 101BR's just the 101D's re-named ?
     
  9. ajohn

    ajohn Active Member

    The tangent of the end of the curve on the template I have is about 45 degrees at the end where it meets the front of the worktop. So probably not what you have visualised.

    Another way of putting it is that it's curve leading to a 45 degree corner so similar in some ways to just cutting 45 degrees off which I don't fancy doing. I think the curve will look better. This particular end of a U finishes up within an inch of meeting a door architrave, lounge to kitchen. The curve is on a jig that has had it and is ok and intended for peninsulae rather than cutting corners off.

    CurvedEnd.jpg

    John
    -
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  10. Scott Green

    Scott Green Member

    Ok I see it now. Yes that will finish ok, was thinking you were doing a full curve
     
  11. ajohn

    ajohn Active Member

    I'm surprised you use them. I'd forgotten that I started cutting the hole for the sink with the 101BR's and they curved after a couple of 100mm cut. I had misgivings when I started as had tried down cut on other materials. The 101B use exactly the same tooth profile etc but are up cutting. It makes far more sense use those and cut worktop face down.

    Also wonder if Dewalt blades are better than Bosch. Way more bimetal blades as well at a reasonable cost. :rolleyes: Must admit I have a downer on Bosch - 2 bust combi drills while doing the kitchen. Clutch, drill and hammer setting thingy broke on both. Never again.

    :D Each to his or her own etc though.

    John
    -
     
  12. kitfit1

    kitfit1 Well-Known Member

    Yep, each to his own. Of course, How you use a jigsaw and how well you know the one you are using makes a big difference to the end result.
     

Share This Page