Joining 10.0mm cable.

Discussion in 'Electricians' Talk' started by jeff_w, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. jeff_w

    jeff_w New Member

    Can anyone recommend a safe and competenet way of joining 10.0mm T/E Cable, I've just run it in for a shower and have realised that I am just a little short, has this happened to anybody before and if so how they got around this problem. Thanks all.
     
  2. Sam Dingle

    Sam Dingle New Member

    If there isn't a proper jb big enough you can use a cooker outlet plate and a suitable deep back box to make the joint.
    Make sure your terminals are nice and tight.
     
  3. jeff_w

    jeff_w New Member

    Thankyou mate.
     
  4. sparkydude

    sparkydude New Member

    TLC do a 60 a joint box which im sure will fit the bill perfectly for what you need

    Nick
     
  5. leeds spark

    leeds spark New Member

    Whilst on the subject,is there n easy way to get 10millys into a 45a cieling switch?i usually break a couple of boxes before succeeding.
     
  6. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    10.0mm into 45A ceiling swtiches? You have to have fingers as strong as those of a world-class rock climber to bend the buggers in! There is a get-round though. If you've enough room you can make the tails nice and long. This gives a little more flexibility for bending. Drop some sleeving on first. Make off for long tails and connect up. Pull sleeving back to box entry hole and apply heat to shrink. Again, it depends on how much room you have.
     
  7. gerrin2owd

    gerrin2owd New Member

    Whilst on the subject,is there n easy way to get
    10millys into a 45a cieling switch?i usually break a
    couple of boxes before succeeding.

    Fit the deepest box, leave spare length on the cables, strip the cable just enough to connect into the switch and earth wires into terminal. Then if you have a mate get him to pull the slack into the attic whilst you guide the pull switch into position. If you have no mate pull it up yourself after you have "shaped" the wires to fit the switch and box. Easy!
     
  8. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    Just had another thought - Thanks to B-A-S! You could use one of those service connection units (Henley Blocks) to join the cable with. A 60A one should do the job so long as you can conceal it:)
     
  9. sparkydude

    sparkydude New Member

    Sorry to say Trician you cant use a henley block to connect two 10mm T+E as to connect them you would have to strip the sleeving back thus making the cable single insulated, which is not allowed . And also where do the earths go?? perhaps could use a henley block inside an adaptable box, and a piece of connector block on the earth , but not on its own under the floor or wherever.

    Sorry to pee on your fireworks LOL

    Nick
     
  10. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    Guilty as charged your Honour :)
    What a major cock-up!
    Shouldn't have had that lunchtime pint!
    Always happens on a Friday!
     
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    Sorry to say Trician you cant use a henley block to connect two 10mm T+E as to connect them you would have to strip the sleeving back thus making the cable single insulated, which is not allowed .

    If you used a DP block, would you need to strip the sheath back beyond the point of entry?
     
  12. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    I think so, these blocks, as you are probably already aware, are really meant for double insulated single core meter tails, so the entry holes are round. This gives problems when attempting to terminate something like 10.00mm T+E into them. You'd have to split the seperate cores so they'd go into the L & N entry holes. The only other way would be to fit the block inside another enclosure and add an earth block/strip. If you were going to go to all this trouble you might as well buy an enclosure, some DIN rail, and a 10 or 16A clip-on stud terminals. Fit some 10.00mm eye-lugs on the cable ends, fit them on to the studs and tighten up your nuts!

    Don't forget a couple of 25mm CTS cable glands and locknuts too!
     
  13. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    I'm going to have to end up doing something like this, because I want an extractor fan in my bathroom controlled by the shower switch, not the light, and as I can't get 2 x 10mm into the switch terminals, that means splitting the incoming supply cable to go to the switch and to a fuse to become the unswitched live for the fan, and then the output from the switch needs to be split to feed the shower and another fuse for the switched live for the fan.

    To split the conductors I was going to use either service blocks or rail mounted stud or feed-through terminals. (I take it you meant 10 or 16mm studs, not 10 or 16A...)

    I take your point about terminating T&E at a service block - might not be the easiest thing to do.

    One big question - do I actually need to put all of this in a box? What are the regs for protection of the terminals, or single-insulated conductors? All of the connections would be under the floorboards of the loft (and above a sheet of ply or MDF fixed between the joists), and thus well protected against intrusion, and in effect inside a wooden enclosure that needs tools to open. Would this meet the requirements, or would I still need to put it all in a box?

    I assume a 25mm gland is the size I need to bear down on 10mm T&E?
     
  14. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    Check out IP Ratings in the Regs or OSG.
    Also, type 'British Standard Finger Test' into Google and see what it comes up with.
    Its a good idea to put it all in a box. Try a wholesaler who deals with 'Rittal' enclosures - German made, reasonably cheap and really good quality.
    The terminals should be rated for their curent-carrying capacity. The actual physical stud size could be 8 or 10mm.
     
  15. The Trician

    The Trician New Member

    OH, and yes, the CTS gland size for 10mm t+e is 25mm.
     
  16. sparky Si-Fi

    sparky Si-Fi Screwfix Select

    TLC do a 60 a joint box which im sure will fit the
    bill perfectly for what you need

    Nick

    Go as sparky dude,this seems the most practical and safest way to me as well and I agree with most,levering 10mm in a surface/flush box is for people with arms like Arnie!
     
  17. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    Check out IP Ratings in the Regs or OSG

    With the loft floor back in place it'd probably rate IP41
     
  18. bilco

    bilco New Member

    BAS

    Why not use a fan with humidistat instead?
     
  19. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds New Member

    I thought about a humidistat, but

    a) I was concerned that it wouldn't start working until the bathroom filled with steam

    b) Ideally I want to put the fan SELV source/control unit out of sight, either inside a cupboard or in the loft, and it wouldn't register the humidity there...
     
  20. lastword

    lastword New Member

    Here you go BAS - http://www.edw-uk.com/e-wholesaler/ewcats/cat3120.htm

    Xpelair LV 100H, it's a 12V fan with built in humidistat. They do one with a PIR sensor as well (LV 100PIR). Bit lumpy at £100, but will save your pinkies from 10mm, and your brain from having to work out the IP rating of MDF!
     

Share This Page